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People with dementia and their family carers' satisfaction with a memory service: a qualitative evaluation generating quality indicators for dementia care

People with dementia and their family carers' satisfaction with a memory service: a qualitative evaluation generating quality indicators for dementia care
People with dementia and their family carers' satisfaction with a memory service: a qualitative evaluation generating quality indicators for dementia care
Background: UK health policy requires the early identification and management of dementia. There are few good quality evaluations of models of care in dementia with a particular lack of data from user and carer perspectives. The Croydon Memory Service Model (CMSM) was developed to identify and treat people in the early stages of dementia and its evaluation includes an assessment of service satisfaction.

Aim: to complete a qualitative investigation into the satisfaction with the service of those assessed and treated using the CMSM.

Method: the CMSM was the subject of a multi-method evaluation, as part of this, semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 people with dementia and 15 family carers to establish their opinions of the service. Purposive sampling was used to identify participants with a range of diagnosis, ethnicity, and age. Conventional Content Analysis was used to analyse the data.

Results: six themes concerning satisfaction emerged from the data: initial experience of dementia; service experience; helpful interventions; normalizing the catastrophic; clear communication; and gaps in service. Peer support and clear communication were seen as valuable assets provided by the service, allowing participants to use coping strategies which normalized having dementia.

Conclusions: from these data we can derive seven quality indicators with which to judge services for people with dementia: (i) provision of broad-based care as well as assessment; (ii) clear communication about diagnosis and care; (iii) continuing peer support groups; (iv) easy availability of staff; (v) professional staff behaviour; (vi) the service working for people with young-onset dementia and their carers; (vii) strategies to manage those with subjective memory impairment but no objective deficits


26-37
Willis, Rosalind
dd2e5e10-58bf-44ca-9c04-f355f3af26ba
Chan, Jeni
698d9db4-6a05-4951-93e4-15f4d9d9e904
Murray, Joanna
e4c89a6e-d81c-4378-8786-0e82eeed6b58
Matthews, David
f8699e10-6109-4fae-945c-0b76ef43fd3c
Banerjee, Sube
c89df0e0-46cf-482b-ac93-6c39333c93b5
Willis, Rosalind
dd2e5e10-58bf-44ca-9c04-f355f3af26ba
Chan, Jeni
698d9db4-6a05-4951-93e4-15f4d9d9e904
Murray, Joanna
e4c89a6e-d81c-4378-8786-0e82eeed6b58
Matthews, David
f8699e10-6109-4fae-945c-0b76ef43fd3c
Banerjee, Sube
c89df0e0-46cf-482b-ac93-6c39333c93b5

Willis, Rosalind, Chan, Jeni, Murray, Joanna, Matthews, David and Banerjee, Sube (2009) People with dementia and their family carers' satisfaction with a memory service: a qualitative evaluation generating quality indicators for dementia care. Journal of Mental Health, 18 (1), 26-37. (doi:10.1080/09638230701529681).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: UK health policy requires the early identification and management of dementia. There are few good quality evaluations of models of care in dementia with a particular lack of data from user and carer perspectives. The Croydon Memory Service Model (CMSM) was developed to identify and treat people in the early stages of dementia and its evaluation includes an assessment of service satisfaction.

Aim: to complete a qualitative investigation into the satisfaction with the service of those assessed and treated using the CMSM.

Method: the CMSM was the subject of a multi-method evaluation, as part of this, semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 people with dementia and 15 family carers to establish their opinions of the service. Purposive sampling was used to identify participants with a range of diagnosis, ethnicity, and age. Conventional Content Analysis was used to analyse the data.

Results: six themes concerning satisfaction emerged from the data: initial experience of dementia; service experience; helpful interventions; normalizing the catastrophic; clear communication; and gaps in service. Peer support and clear communication were seen as valuable assets provided by the service, allowing participants to use coping strategies which normalized having dementia.

Conclusions: from these data we can derive seven quality indicators with which to judge services for people with dementia: (i) provision of broad-based care as well as assessment; (ii) clear communication about diagnosis and care; (iii) continuing peer support groups; (iv) easy availability of staff; (v) professional staff behaviour; (vi) the service working for people with young-onset dementia and their carers; (vii) strategies to manage those with subjective memory impairment but no objective deficits


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Published date: 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 180015
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/180015
PURE UUID: 0e219e09-25f9-4830-b41a-510be8b0f091
ORCID for Rosalind Willis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6687-5799

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Date deposited: 07 Apr 2011 10:08
Last modified: 12 Nov 2019 01:41

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Contributors

Author: Rosalind Willis ORCID iD
Author: Jeni Chan
Author: Joanna Murray
Author: David Matthews
Author: Sube Banerjee

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