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Is there a role for fatty acids in early life programming of the immune system?

Is there a role for fatty acids in early life programming of the immune system?
Is there a role for fatty acids in early life programming of the immune system?
There may be a causal relationship between n-6 PUFA intake and allergic disease and there are biologically plausible mechanisms, involving eicosanoid mediators of the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid, that could explain this. There is some evidence that high linoleic acid intake is linked with increased risk of atopic sensitisation and allergic manifestations. Fish and fish oils are sources of long-chain n-3 PUFA and these fatty acids act to oppose the actions of n-6 PUFA. It is considered that n-3 PUFA will protect against atopic sensitisation and against the clinical manifestations of atopy. All five epidemiological studies investigating the effect of maternal fish intake during pregnancy on atopic or allergic outcomes in infants/children of those pregnancies concluded protective associations. Epidemiological studies investigating the effects of fish intake during infancy and childhood on atopic outcomes in those infants or children are inconsistent, although the majority of the studies (9/14) showed a protective effect of fish. Fish oil provision to pregnant women is associated with immunologic changes in cord blood. Provision of fish oil during pregnancy may reduce sensitisation to common food allergens and reduce the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. This effect may persist until adolescence with a reduction in prevalence and/or severity of eczema, hayfever and asthma. Fish oil supplementation in infancy may decrease the risk of developing some manifestations of allergic disease, but whether this benefit persists as other factors come into play remains to be determined
0029-6651
373-380
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Kremmyda, L.S.
19781569-bda8-478a-842e-d0e97cce6298
Vlachava, M
d1f1157c-35bb-4eb6-8d5d-b6135d83563f
Noakes, Paul
0ed50cd9-de73-4851-8039-ee72860d8ae5
Miles, Elizabeth A.
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Kremmyda, L.S.
19781569-bda8-478a-842e-d0e97cce6298
Vlachava, M
d1f1157c-35bb-4eb6-8d5d-b6135d83563f
Noakes, Paul
0ed50cd9-de73-4851-8039-ee72860d8ae5
Miles, Elizabeth A.
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416

Calder, P.C., Kremmyda, L.S., Vlachava, M, Noakes, Paul and Miles, Elizabeth A. (2010) Is there a role for fatty acids in early life programming of the immune system? Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 69 (3), 373-380. (doi:10.1017/S0029665110001552). (PMID:20462467)

Record type: Article

Abstract

There may be a causal relationship between n-6 PUFA intake and allergic disease and there are biologically plausible mechanisms, involving eicosanoid mediators of the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid, that could explain this. There is some evidence that high linoleic acid intake is linked with increased risk of atopic sensitisation and allergic manifestations. Fish and fish oils are sources of long-chain n-3 PUFA and these fatty acids act to oppose the actions of n-6 PUFA. It is considered that n-3 PUFA will protect against atopic sensitisation and against the clinical manifestations of atopy. All five epidemiological studies investigating the effect of maternal fish intake during pregnancy on atopic or allergic outcomes in infants/children of those pregnancies concluded protective associations. Epidemiological studies investigating the effects of fish intake during infancy and childhood on atopic outcomes in those infants or children are inconsistent, although the majority of the studies (9/14) showed a protective effect of fish. Fish oil provision to pregnant women is associated with immunologic changes in cord blood. Provision of fish oil during pregnancy may reduce sensitisation to common food allergens and reduce the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. This effect may persist until adolescence with a reduction in prevalence and/or severity of eczema, hayfever and asthma. Fish oil supplementation in infancy may decrease the risk of developing some manifestations of allergic disease, but whether this benefit persists as other factors come into play remains to be determined

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More information

Published date: August 2010
Additional Information: The 3rd International Immunonutrition Workshop, Platja D'Aro, Girona, Spain, 21–24 October, 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 180645
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/180645
ISSN: 0029-6651
PURE UUID: 0c737979-d961-4306-b7db-73ca799f17a6
ORCID for Paul Noakes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2678-1971
ORCID for Elizabeth A. Miles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0655

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Apr 2011 14:03
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 03:09

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