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A theory of shoe wear pattern influence incorporating a new paradigm for the podiatric medical profession

A theory of shoe wear pattern influence incorporating a new paradigm for the podiatric medical profession
A theory of shoe wear pattern influence incorporating a new paradigm for the podiatric medical profession
Qualitative analysis of shoe wear patterns collected from a questionnaire evaluating podiatric physicians' experiences in this area suggests that wear patterns could indicate causative function within a known pathologic context. Several different functions are suggested by patterns associated with each of the pathologic entities involved, and analysis of the relationship between patterns and reasons given by respondents for pattern-form variations show the strongest associations to be with functionally termed conditions. A basic model is proposed to present factors important in wear pattern production, suggesting that a new concept of primary walking intention is more influential than foot pathologies in wear pattern formation and that external factors are also influential, with the combined factors being described as the "holistic foot function." This model may provide a variety of benefits to podiatric medicine as shoe wear patterns are records of the usual long-term activity of the functioning foot, this paradigm could form a basis for podiatric medical practice.
3750-7315
261 - 268
Vernon, Wesley
7d3d1ec7-3060-49e2-90c3-df3a761b4dda
Parry, Anne
576c7963-4f9c-4101-9510-81ff9c7edb02
Potter, Michael
90277857-5e0c-4e5f-812d-7263eb0070b9
Vernon, Wesley
7d3d1ec7-3060-49e2-90c3-df3a761b4dda
Parry, Anne
576c7963-4f9c-4101-9510-81ff9c7edb02
Potter, Michael
90277857-5e0c-4e5f-812d-7263eb0070b9

Vernon, Wesley, Parry, Anne and Potter, Michael (2004) A theory of shoe wear pattern influence incorporating a new paradigm for the podiatric medical profession. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, 94 (3), 261 - 268. (doi:10.7547/0940261).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Qualitative analysis of shoe wear patterns collected from a questionnaire evaluating podiatric physicians' experiences in this area suggests that wear patterns could indicate causative function within a known pathologic context. Several different functions are suggested by patterns associated with each of the pathologic entities involved, and analysis of the relationship between patterns and reasons given by respondents for pattern-form variations show the strongest associations to be with functionally termed conditions. A basic model is proposed to present factors important in wear pattern production, suggesting that a new concept of primary walking intention is more influential than foot pathologies in wear pattern formation and that external factors are also influential, with the combined factors being described as the "holistic foot function." This model may provide a variety of benefits to podiatric medicine as shoe wear patterns are records of the usual long-term activity of the functioning foot, this paradigm could form a basis for podiatric medical practice.

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More information

Published date: 1 May 2004

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18084
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18084
ISSN: 3750-7315
PURE UUID: 16e763d9-3aa2-4a0d-ba32-b2b737b9247c

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Date deposited: 14 Nov 2005
Last modified: 02 Aug 2022 17:03

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Contributors

Author: Wesley Vernon
Author: Anne Parry
Author: Michael Potter

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