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Spatial covariance between biodiversity and other ecosystem service priorities

Spatial covariance between biodiversity and other ecosystem service priorities
Spatial covariance between biodiversity and other ecosystem service priorities
Ecosystems support biodiversity and also provide goods and services that are beneficial to humans. The extent to which the locations that are most valuable for ecosystem services coincide with those that support the most biodiversity is of critical importance when designing conservation and land management strategies. There are, however, few studies on which to base any kind of conclusion about possible spatial patterns of association between ecosystem services and biodiversity. Moreover, little is known about the sensitivity of the conclusions to the quality of the data available, or to the choice and size of the region used for analysis.

Here, we first present national-scale estimates of the spatial covariance in areas important for ecosystem services and biodiversity (richness of species of conservation concern), using Britain as a case study. We then explore how these associations are sensitive to the spatial resolution of the available data, the spatial extent of our study region and to regional variation across the study area.

Our analyses reveal a mixture of negative and positive associations. In particular, the regionalization analysis shows that one can arrive at diametrically opposing conclusions about relationships between ecosystem services and biodiversity by studying the same question within different areas, even within a moderately small island.

Synthesis and applications. In a policy context, the location-specific nature of relationships between ecosystem services and biodiversity underscores the importance of multi-scale environmental decision-making, so as to reflect both local conditions and broader-scale priorities. The results also suggest that efforts to establish general patterns of congruence in ecosystem services and biodiversity may offer a less constructive way forward than do more regional approaches
agriculture value, BAP species, britain, carbon storage, conservation, ecosystem services, planning, recreation, species richness, trade-offs
888-896
Anderson, Barbara J.
9cda6238-a0dc-4fad-b3a8-7849ba033766
Armsworth, Paul R.
b139013b-4201-4c71-804f-b3f9c01316b3
Eigenbrod, Felix
43efc6ae-b129-45a2-8a34-e489b5f05827
Thomas, Chris D.
bbcfba65-4f02-4a50-9a9e-04b8e046671d
Gillings, Simon
a3908516-53f4-41f2-9f9d-d20137044f79
Heinemeyer, Andreas
4014ceb3-f411-42fc-8251-99c4a608eb7e
Roy, David B.
75efe5f9-82d3-42c6-bfbb-1c3997dc1221
Gaston, Kevin J.
8d5f7517-9d47-442a-a11c-1a53304041e3
Anderson, Barbara J.
9cda6238-a0dc-4fad-b3a8-7849ba033766
Armsworth, Paul R.
b139013b-4201-4c71-804f-b3f9c01316b3
Eigenbrod, Felix
43efc6ae-b129-45a2-8a34-e489b5f05827
Thomas, Chris D.
bbcfba65-4f02-4a50-9a9e-04b8e046671d
Gillings, Simon
a3908516-53f4-41f2-9f9d-d20137044f79
Heinemeyer, Andreas
4014ceb3-f411-42fc-8251-99c4a608eb7e
Roy, David B.
75efe5f9-82d3-42c6-bfbb-1c3997dc1221
Gaston, Kevin J.
8d5f7517-9d47-442a-a11c-1a53304041e3

Anderson, Barbara J., Armsworth, Paul R., Eigenbrod, Felix, Thomas, Chris D., Gillings, Simon, Heinemeyer, Andreas, Roy, David B. and Gaston, Kevin J. (2009) Spatial covariance between biodiversity and other ecosystem service priorities. Journal of Applied Ecology, 46 (4), 888-896. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2664.2009.01666.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ecosystems support biodiversity and also provide goods and services that are beneficial to humans. The extent to which the locations that are most valuable for ecosystem services coincide with those that support the most biodiversity is of critical importance when designing conservation and land management strategies. There are, however, few studies on which to base any kind of conclusion about possible spatial patterns of association between ecosystem services and biodiversity. Moreover, little is known about the sensitivity of the conclusions to the quality of the data available, or to the choice and size of the region used for analysis.

Here, we first present national-scale estimates of the spatial covariance in areas important for ecosystem services and biodiversity (richness of species of conservation concern), using Britain as a case study. We then explore how these associations are sensitive to the spatial resolution of the available data, the spatial extent of our study region and to regional variation across the study area.

Our analyses reveal a mixture of negative and positive associations. In particular, the regionalization analysis shows that one can arrive at diametrically opposing conclusions about relationships between ecosystem services and biodiversity by studying the same question within different areas, even within a moderately small island.

Synthesis and applications. In a policy context, the location-specific nature of relationships between ecosystem services and biodiversity underscores the importance of multi-scale environmental decision-making, so as to reflect both local conditions and broader-scale priorities. The results also suggest that efforts to establish general patterns of congruence in ecosystem services and biodiversity may offer a less constructive way forward than do more regional approaches

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: August 2009
Keywords: agriculture value, BAP species, britain, carbon storage, conservation, ecosystem services, planning, recreation, species richness, trade-offs

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 181367
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/181367
PURE UUID: 28e3bb50-90b1-45dc-9731-ddfb4c83e9e0
ORCID for Felix Eigenbrod: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8982-824X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Apr 2011 11:03
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 01:42

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Contributors

Author: Barbara J. Anderson
Author: Paul R. Armsworth
Author: Felix Eigenbrod ORCID iD
Author: Chris D. Thomas
Author: Simon Gillings
Author: Andreas Heinemeyer
Author: David B. Roy
Author: Kevin J. Gaston

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