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Evolution of a buried magnetic field in the central compact object neutron stars

Evolution of a buried magnetic field in the central compact object neutron stars
Evolution of a buried magnetic field in the central compact object neutron stars
The central compact objects are a newly emerging class of young neutron stars near the centre of supernova remnants. From X-ray timing and spectral measurements, their magnetic fields are determined to be ?1010–1011 G, which is significantly lower than that found on most pulsars. Using the latest electrical and thermal conductivity calculations, we solve the induction equation to determine the evolution of a buried crustal or core magnetic field. We apply this model of a buried field to explain the youth and low observed magnetic field of the central compact objects. We obtain constraints on their birth magnetic field and depth of submergence (or accreted mass). Measurement of a change in the observed magnetic field strength would discriminate between the crustal and core fields and could yield uniquely the birth magnetic field and submergence depth. If we consider the central compact objects as a single neutron star viewed at different epochs, then we constrain the magnetic field at birth to be ?(6–9) × 1011 G. A buried magnetic field can also explain their location in an underpopulated region of the spin period–period derivative plane for pulsars.

stars, evolution, magnetic field, neutron, pulsars, individual, 1e 1207.4?5209, psr j0821?4300, psr j1852+0040
0035-8711
2567-2575
Ho, Wynn C.G.
d78d4c52-8f92-4846-876f-e04a8f803a45
Ho, Wynn C.G.
d78d4c52-8f92-4846-876f-e04a8f803a45

Ho, Wynn C.G. (2011) Evolution of a buried magnetic field in the central compact object neutron stars. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 414 (3), 2567-2575. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.18576.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The central compact objects are a newly emerging class of young neutron stars near the centre of supernova remnants. From X-ray timing and spectral measurements, their magnetic fields are determined to be ?1010–1011 G, which is significantly lower than that found on most pulsars. Using the latest electrical and thermal conductivity calculations, we solve the induction equation to determine the evolution of a buried crustal or core magnetic field. We apply this model of a buried field to explain the youth and low observed magnetic field of the central compact objects. We obtain constraints on their birth magnetic field and depth of submergence (or accreted mass). Measurement of a change in the observed magnetic field strength would discriminate between the crustal and core fields and could yield uniquely the birth magnetic field and submergence depth. If we consider the central compact objects as a single neutron star viewed at different epochs, then we constrain the magnetic field at birth to be ?(6–9) × 1011 G. A buried magnetic field can also explain their location in an underpopulated region of the spin period–period derivative plane for pulsars.

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More information

Published date: 7 April 2011
Keywords: stars, evolution, magnetic field, neutron, pulsars, individual, 1e 1207.4?5209, psr j0821?4300, psr j1852+0040

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 181531
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/181531
ISSN: 0035-8711
PURE UUID: a65d39cd-9e52-4caa-ad65-c75ec3279a67
ORCID for Wynn C.G. Ho: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6089-6836

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Apr 2011 10:58
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:00

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