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How the tea is made; or, the scoping and scaling of 'everyday life' in changing services for 'people with learning disabilities'

How the tea is made; or, the scoping and scaling of 'everyday life' in changing services for 'people with learning disabilities'
How the tea is made; or, the scoping and scaling of 'everyday life' in changing services for 'people with learning disabilities'
In the late 20th century the day services which had been set up for adults defined as having learning disabilities became understood as problematic because of the effects of segregation. The new solution became the adjustment of services in order to support a governmental form of personhood; a model of personhood defined by independence, the ability to make choices and be in control, to exercise rights and to take a place within the community and within society. This article tracks the technical changes to everyday life that underpinned this shift - specifically changes in tea making in Croydon’s day services since the late 1960s and techniques of person-centred planning via widely used policy and guidance documents. Through deploying the analytical lenses of ‘scope’ and ‘scale’, two questions are pursued: What is understood as legitimising a person with learning disabilities’ choice? On what scale does choice have to take place in order to be understood as realising ‘choice’ or ‘control’ as they are imagined in policy documents such as Valuing People?

choice, citizenship, day services, inclusion, learning disability
1354-4187
133-143
Graham, Helen
81ea8662-d074-4eee-ba47-2af3ac965b7c
Graham, Helen
81ea8662-d074-4eee-ba47-2af3ac965b7c

Graham, Helen (2010) How the tea is made; or, the scoping and scaling of 'everyday life' in changing services for 'people with learning disabilities'. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 38 (2), 133-143. (doi:10.1111/j.1468-3156.2010.00637.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In the late 20th century the day services which had been set up for adults defined as having learning disabilities became understood as problematic because of the effects of segregation. The new solution became the adjustment of services in order to support a governmental form of personhood; a model of personhood defined by independence, the ability to make choices and be in control, to exercise rights and to take a place within the community and within society. This article tracks the technical changes to everyday life that underpinned this shift - specifically changes in tea making in Croydon’s day services since the late 1960s and techniques of person-centred planning via widely used policy and guidance documents. Through deploying the analytical lenses of ‘scope’ and ‘scale’, two questions are pursued: What is understood as legitimising a person with learning disabilities’ choice? On what scale does choice have to take place in order to be understood as realising ‘choice’ or ‘control’ as they are imagined in policy documents such as Valuing People?

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Published date: June 2010
Keywords: choice, citizenship, day services, inclusion, learning disability

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 182055
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/182055
ISSN: 1354-4187
PURE UUID: d537f957-d15c-4328-a770-46fc2d44eb54

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Date deposited: 27 Apr 2011 09:20
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:58

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