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Recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis: causes, prevention and management

Record type: Article

Longitudinal studies indicate that 20% of paediatric patients account for 80% of all admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The frequency of DKA peaks during adolescence and, although individuals generally go into remission, they may continue to have bouts of recurrent DKA in adulthood. The evidence for insulin omission being the behavioural precursor to recurrent DKA is reviewed and discussed. Thereafter the range of possible psychosocial causes is explored and the evidence for each discussed. Approaches to assessing the individual and their family to identify aetiology and therefore appropriate intervention are considered and treatment options reviewed. Finally, the paper examines potential risk factors for recurrent DKA, possible strategies for identifying these early and how to use these assessments to prevent subsequent recurrent DKA.

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Citation

Skinner, T. Chas (2002) Recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis: causes, prevention and management Hormone Research, 57, (Supplement 1), pp. 78-80. (doi:10.1159/000053320).

More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: diabetic ketoacidosis, insulin omission, psychosocial approaches

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18222
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18222
ISSN: 0301-0163
PURE UUID: c392b09a-cac3-451b-8be3-c2b8bef7fb7c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:36

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Contributors

Author: T. Chas Skinner

University divisions


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