The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A randomised control trial of the effect of negotiated telephone support on glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes

A randomised control trial of the effect of negotiated telephone support on glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes
A randomised control trial of the effect of negotiated telephone support on glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes
Aim: To evaluate changes in self-efficacy for self-management in young people with Type 1 diabetes participating in a 'Negotiated Telephone Support' (NTS) intervention developed using the principles of problem solving and social learning theory.
Methods: One-year RCT with 79 young people (male 39; mean age ± sd 16.5 ± 3.2 years, duration 6.7 ± 4.4 years, HbA1c 8.6 ± 1.5%) randomized into: Group 1 (control group), continued routine management, n = 28; Group 2, continued routine management with NTS, n = 25; Group 3, annual clinic with NTS, n = 26. Outcome measures: HbA1c, self-efficacy, barriers to adherence, problem solving, and diabetes knowledge.
Results: There were no differences between the groups at baseline. Participants in Groups 2 and 3 received an average of 16 telephone calls/year (range 5–19), median duration 9 min (2–30), with a median interval of 3 weeks (1–24) between calls. Significant correlations were found between age and average length of call (r = 0.44, P < 0.01) and frequency of contact (r = 0.36, P < 0.05). Social and school topics were discussed frequently. After 1 year, while the participants in the two intervention groups showed significant improvements in self-efficacy (P = 0.035), there was no difference in glycaemic control in the three groups. Barriers to insulin use adherence were a significant predictor of HbA1c (P < 0.001) after controlling for baseline.
Conclusions: NTS is an effective medium to deliver a simple theory-based psychological intervention to enhance self-efficacy for diabetes self-management. Reduced clinic attendance, combined with NTS, did not result in a deterioration of HbA1c. Intensive personal support needs to be combined with intensive diabetes therapy to improve glycaemic control in this age group.
type 1 diabetes, self efficacy, adherence, problem solving, adolescence
0742-3071
643-648
Howells, L.
e8a7382e-179a-446e-8efa-c92cf3226fb5
Wilson, A.C.
31c9aed0-15c7-43c7-90d4-37620a149744
Skinner, T.C.
266ca58c-9a2e-4bc3-97b2-e9dc905b03ab
Newton, R.
5ec87291-b3f9-4d33-9020-d9be787919e2
Morris, A.D.
a0bbb5f9-428d-4880-94dc-5051c329ee0b
Greene, S.A.
6a444115-d955-4fb6-a4f6-508d9d35e16f
Howells, L.
e8a7382e-179a-446e-8efa-c92cf3226fb5
Wilson, A.C.
31c9aed0-15c7-43c7-90d4-37620a149744
Skinner, T.C.
266ca58c-9a2e-4bc3-97b2-e9dc905b03ab
Newton, R.
5ec87291-b3f9-4d33-9020-d9be787919e2
Morris, A.D.
a0bbb5f9-428d-4880-94dc-5051c329ee0b
Greene, S.A.
6a444115-d955-4fb6-a4f6-508d9d35e16f

Howells, L., Wilson, A.C., Skinner, T.C., Newton, R., Morris, A.D. and Greene, S.A. (2002) A randomised control trial of the effect of negotiated telephone support on glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic Medicine, 19 (8), 643-648. (doi:10.1046/j.1464-5491.2002.00791.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate changes in self-efficacy for self-management in young people with Type 1 diabetes participating in a 'Negotiated Telephone Support' (NTS) intervention developed using the principles of problem solving and social learning theory.
Methods: One-year RCT with 79 young people (male 39; mean age ± sd 16.5 ± 3.2 years, duration 6.7 ± 4.4 years, HbA1c 8.6 ± 1.5%) randomized into: Group 1 (control group), continued routine management, n = 28; Group 2, continued routine management with NTS, n = 25; Group 3, annual clinic with NTS, n = 26. Outcome measures: HbA1c, self-efficacy, barriers to adherence, problem solving, and diabetes knowledge.
Results: There were no differences between the groups at baseline. Participants in Groups 2 and 3 received an average of 16 telephone calls/year (range 5–19), median duration 9 min (2–30), with a median interval of 3 weeks (1–24) between calls. Significant correlations were found between age and average length of call (r = 0.44, P < 0.01) and frequency of contact (r = 0.36, P < 0.05). Social and school topics were discussed frequently. After 1 year, while the participants in the two intervention groups showed significant improvements in self-efficacy (P = 0.035), there was no difference in glycaemic control in the three groups. Barriers to insulin use adherence were a significant predictor of HbA1c (P < 0.001) after controlling for baseline.
Conclusions: NTS is an effective medium to deliver a simple theory-based psychological intervention to enhance self-efficacy for diabetes self-management. Reduced clinic attendance, combined with NTS, did not result in a deterioration of HbA1c. Intensive personal support needs to be combined with intensive diabetes therapy to improve glycaemic control in this age group.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: type 1 diabetes, self efficacy, adherence, problem solving, adolescence

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18229
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18229
ISSN: 0742-3071
PURE UUID: 54e0606e-6948-4163-b2e5-3ca2de93ec99

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:29

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×