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Narcissism, self-esteem, and the positivity of self-views: two portraits of self-love

Narcissism, self-esteem, and the positivity of self-views: two portraits of self-love
Narcissism, self-esteem, and the positivity of self-views: two portraits of self-love
The authors hypothesized that both narcissism and high self-esteem are associated with positive self-views but each is associated with positivity in different domains of the self. Narcissists perceive themselves as better than average on traits reflecting an agentic orientation (e.g., intellectual skills, extraversion) but not on those reflecting a communal orientation (e.g., agreeableness, morality).In contrast, high-self-esteem individuals perceive themselves as better than average both on agentic and communal traits. Three studies confirmed the hypothesis. In Study 1, narcissists rated themselves as extraverted and open to experience but not as more agreeable or emotionally stable. High-self-esteem individuals rated themselves highly on all of these traits except openness. In Study 2, narcissists (but not high-self-esteem individuals) rated themselves as better than their romantic partners. In Study 3, narcissists rated themselves as more intelligent, but not more moral, than the average person. In contrast, high-self-esteem individuals viewed themselves as more moral and more intelligent.
narcisissism, self-esteem, self-concept, self-enhancement
0146-1672
358-368
Campbell, W. K.
840f519b-95fd-4e76-bcb4-918725c3fa36
Rudich, E.
0b27f005-7a03-49c8-934a-437ddd115d25
Sedikides, C.
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Campbell, W. K.
840f519b-95fd-4e76-bcb4-918725c3fa36
Rudich, E.
0b27f005-7a03-49c8-934a-437ddd115d25
Sedikides, C.
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2

Campbell, W. K., Rudich, E. and Sedikides, C. (2002) Narcissism, self-esteem, and the positivity of self-views: two portraits of self-love. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 28 (3), 358-368.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The authors hypothesized that both narcissism and high self-esteem are associated with positive self-views but each is associated with positivity in different domains of the self. Narcissists perceive themselves as better than average on traits reflecting an agentic orientation (e.g., intellectual skills, extraversion) but not on those reflecting a communal orientation (e.g., agreeableness, morality).In contrast, high-self-esteem individuals perceive themselves as better than average both on agentic and communal traits. Three studies confirmed the hypothesis. In Study 1, narcissists rated themselves as extraverted and open to experience but not as more agreeable or emotionally stable. High-self-esteem individuals rated themselves highly on all of these traits except openness. In Study 2, narcissists (but not high-self-esteem individuals) rated themselves as better than their romantic partners. In Study 3, narcissists rated themselves as more intelligent, but not more moral, than the average person. In contrast, high-self-esteem individuals viewed themselves as more moral and more intelligent.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: narcisissism, self-esteem, self-concept, self-enhancement

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18236
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18236
ISSN: 0146-1672
PURE UUID: 741f1b14-f4a5-46e8-8b86-b2f0bc113385

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Date deposited: 24 Jan 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:29

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