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Am I nearly there? The effect of anticipated running distance on perceived exertion and attentional focus

Am I nearly there? The effect of anticipated running distance on perceived exertion and attentional focus
Am I nearly there? The effect of anticipated running distance on perceived exertion and attentional focus
Two studies tested the hypothesis that teleoanticipatory mechanisms regulate the perception of exertion (RPE) in the context of expected exercise duration by the adjustment of attentional focus. Study 1 involved 22 runners who participated in a short (8-mile) run and a long (10-mile) run on separate days. Pace did not differ between conditions (M = 6.3 mph). Runners reported on their attentional focus (proportion of associative to dissociative thoughts) and RPE at regular intervals. Study 2 involved 40 participants who ran twice on a treadmill at the same speed and gradient: once when they expected to run for 10 min (short condition) and once when they expected to run for 20 min (long condition). In both studies, RPE was lower throughout the long condition. In Study 1 there were more dissociative thoughts in the long condition. Study 2 showed the same trend, although the results were nonsignificant. In both studies RPE was inversely correlated with dissociative thoughts, supporting the hypothesis that runners pace themselves cognitively by manipulating their attentional focus.
1543-2904
215-231
Baden, Denise A.
daad83b9-c537-4d3c-bab6-548b841f23b5
Warwick-Evans, Lawrence
b0a492f6-08d3-4374-beb7-ae0777b9a8c7
Lakomy, Julie
b4a88871-804c-49c1-a093-5c6109388e7a
Baden, Denise A.
daad83b9-c537-4d3c-bab6-548b841f23b5
Warwick-Evans, Lawrence
b0a492f6-08d3-4374-beb7-ae0777b9a8c7
Lakomy, Julie
b4a88871-804c-49c1-a093-5c6109388e7a

Baden, Denise A., Warwick-Evans, Lawrence and Lakomy, Julie (2004) Am I nearly there? The effect of anticipated running distance on perceived exertion and attentional focus. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 26 (2), 215-231.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two studies tested the hypothesis that teleoanticipatory mechanisms regulate the perception of exertion (RPE) in the context of expected exercise duration by the adjustment of attentional focus. Study 1 involved 22 runners who participated in a short (8-mile) run and a long (10-mile) run on separate days. Pace did not differ between conditions (M = 6.3 mph). Runners reported on their attentional focus (proportion of associative to dissociative thoughts) and RPE at regular intervals. Study 2 involved 40 participants who ran twice on a treadmill at the same speed and gradient: once when they expected to run for 10 min (short condition) and once when they expected to run for 20 min (long condition). In both studies, RPE was lower throughout the long condition. In Study 1 there were more dissociative thoughts in the long condition. Study 2 showed the same trend, although the results were nonsignificant. In both studies RPE was inversely correlated with dissociative thoughts, supporting the hypothesis that runners pace themselves cognitively by manipulating their attentional focus.

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Published date: 2004

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18242
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18242
ISSN: 1543-2904
PURE UUID: 886de778-e709-4600-a449-e164a429c6d9

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Date deposited: 25 Jan 2006
Last modified: 05 Oct 2018 12:04

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