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Parents anticipating misbehaviour: an observational study of strategies parents use to prevent conflict with behaviour problem children

Parents anticipating misbehaviour: an observational study of strategies parents use to prevent conflict with behaviour problem children
Parents anticipating misbehaviour: an observational study of strategies parents use to prevent conflict with behaviour problem children
Research on the role of parenting styles in the development of disruptive behaviour problems has focused primarily on how parents handle conflict once it has occurred. This home observational study examined strategies used by 52 mothers to prevent conflict with 3-year-olds. It was predicted that mothers of children with behaviour problems would use fewer "positive" strategies to resolve conflict, and would use reactive rather than pre-emptive strategies. Results showed frequency of positive strategies did not differ between the groups. Mothers of children with behaviour problems were less likely to use pre-emptive, and more likely to use reactive, strategies. Further analysis showed child conduct problems, rather than other characteristics, best discriminated pre-emptive from reactive strategy users. Follow-up of a subsample found that reactive strategies at age 3 predicted age 5 behaviour problems, even after controlling for age 3 behaviour problems.
1185-1196
Gardner, Frances E.M.
1eb8e38b-4de0-4587-84eb-8b95a76a679c
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Sayal, Kapil
7dac1e7a-54d2-4d7e-862b-addfcfb8513a
Gardner, Frances E.M.
1eb8e38b-4de0-4587-84eb-8b95a76a679c
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Sayal, Kapil
7dac1e7a-54d2-4d7e-862b-addfcfb8513a

Gardner, Frances E.M., Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S. and Sayal, Kapil (1999) Parents anticipating misbehaviour: an observational study of strategies parents use to prevent conflict with behaviour problem children. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 40 (8), 1185-1196. (doi:10.1111/1469-7610.00535).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Research on the role of parenting styles in the development of disruptive behaviour problems has focused primarily on how parents handle conflict once it has occurred. This home observational study examined strategies used by 52 mothers to prevent conflict with 3-year-olds. It was predicted that mothers of children with behaviour problems would use fewer "positive" strategies to resolve conflict, and would use reactive rather than pre-emptive strategies. Results showed frequency of positive strategies did not differ between the groups. Mothers of children with behaviour problems were less likely to use pre-emptive, and more likely to use reactive, strategies. Further analysis showed child conduct problems, rather than other characteristics, best discriminated pre-emptive from reactive strategy users. Follow-up of a subsample found that reactive strategies at age 3 predicted age 5 behaviour problems, even after controlling for age 3 behaviour problems.

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Published date: 1999

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18267
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18267
PURE UUID: b39c0388-f05f-4698-84e7-300d706f4dd0

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Date deposited: 06 Mar 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:29

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