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Judgment heuristics and recognition memory: prime identification and target processing fluency

Judgment heuristics and recognition memory: prime identification and target processing fluency
Judgment heuristics and recognition memory: prime identification and target processing fluency
In three experiments, the effect of identification of a briefly presented word (prime) on a subsequent recognition response to that word (target) was investigated. Theories of current processing fluency (e.g., Jacoby & Whitehouse, 1989) suggest that prime identification should reduce P(old) relative to prime misidentification because awareness of the prime provides a source to which to attribute target fluency, rendering attributions to prior presentation less likely. However, counter to these predictions, Experiment 1 demonstrated that prime identification increased P(old) relative to misidentified primes. It is hypothesized that this reversed effect was due to participants' using a heuristic that related prime identification success to prior presentation but was not based on current processing fluency. In Experiment 2, participants were induced to avoid using this heuristic by making an alternate source for prime identification success (display duration) highly available. Under these circumstances, prime identification reduced P(old) relative to prime misidentification, suggesting that participants now relied on current processing fluency rather than on prime identification success. Experiment 3 replicated the results of Experiments 1 and 2, but with fixed rather than variable prime displays.
0090-502X
574-584
Higham, Philip A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Vokey, John R.
32b95583-7d67-451a-be57-616009a63580
Higham, Philip A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Vokey, John R.
32b95583-7d67-451a-be57-616009a63580

Higham, Philip A. and Vokey, John R. (2000) Judgment heuristics and recognition memory: prime identification and target processing fluency. Memory & Cognition, 28 (4), 574-584.

Record type: Article

Abstract

In three experiments, the effect of identification of a briefly presented word (prime) on a subsequent recognition response to that word (target) was investigated. Theories of current processing fluency (e.g., Jacoby & Whitehouse, 1989) suggest that prime identification should reduce P(old) relative to prime misidentification because awareness of the prime provides a source to which to attribute target fluency, rendering attributions to prior presentation less likely. However, counter to these predictions, Experiment 1 demonstrated that prime identification increased P(old) relative to misidentified primes. It is hypothesized that this reversed effect was due to participants' using a heuristic that related prime identification success to prior presentation but was not based on current processing fluency. In Experiment 2, participants were induced to avoid using this heuristic by making an alternate source for prime identification success (display duration) highly available. Under these circumstances, prime identification reduced P(old) relative to prime misidentification, suggesting that participants now relied on current processing fluency rather than on prime identification success. Experiment 3 replicated the results of Experiments 1 and 2, but with fixed rather than variable prime displays.

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Published date: 2000

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18323
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18323
ISSN: 0090-502X
PURE UUID: 5f5fc879-1e6a-4550-8ffd-959440482515

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Date deposited: 13 Jan 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:28

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