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Beyond dissociation logic: evidence for controlled and automatic influences in artificial grammar learning

Beyond dissociation logic: evidence for controlled and automatic influences in artificial grammar learning
Beyond dissociation logic: evidence for controlled and automatic influences in artificial grammar learning
Evidence for unconscious learning has typically been based on dissociations between direct and indirect tests of learning. Because of some inherent problems with dissociation logic, we applied the logic of opposition to 2 artificial grammar learning experiments. In Experiment 1, participants were exposed to 2 different sets of letter strings, generated from 2 different grammars, and later rated test strings for grammaticality with either in-concert (rate grammatical strings consistent with either structure) or opposition (rate grammatical only strings from 1 of the structures) instructions. Manipulating response deadline affected controlled, but not automatic influences. In Experiment 2, after similar training, a source-monitoring test was administered from which the in-concert and opposition conditions were derived. The test indicated that varying the retention interval affected controlled, but not automatic, influences. The results are discussed in terms of awareness, knowledge representation, and metacognitive processing.
0096-3445
457-470
Higham, P.A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Vokey, J.R.
c9f05491-3bb4-4c77-ba59-7b597ef71043
Pritchard, L.J.
5fcdc8cd-e388-41f6-9533-8191b985b10d
Higham, P.A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Vokey, J.R.
c9f05491-3bb4-4c77-ba59-7b597ef71043
Pritchard, L.J.
5fcdc8cd-e388-41f6-9533-8191b985b10d

Higham, P.A., Vokey, J.R. and Pritchard, L.J. (2000) Beyond dissociation logic: evidence for controlled and automatic influences in artificial grammar learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 129 (4), 457-470.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Evidence for unconscious learning has typically been based on dissociations between direct and indirect tests of learning. Because of some inherent problems with dissociation logic, we applied the logic of opposition to 2 artificial grammar learning experiments. In Experiment 1, participants were exposed to 2 different sets of letter strings, generated from 2 different grammars, and later rated test strings for grammaticality with either in-concert (rate grammatical strings consistent with either structure) or opposition (rate grammatical only strings from 1 of the structures) instructions. Manipulating response deadline affected controlled, but not automatic influences. In Experiment 2, after similar training, a source-monitoring test was administered from which the in-concert and opposition conditions were derived. The test indicated that varying the retention interval affected controlled, but not automatic, influences. The results are discussed in terms of awareness, knowledge representation, and metacognitive processing.

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Published date: 2000

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18326
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18326
ISSN: 0096-3445
PURE UUID: 956e804a-668c-4462-ba59-0356d738f75b

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Date deposited: 13 Jan 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:28

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Contributors

Author: P.A. Higham
Author: J.R. Vokey
Author: L.J. Pritchard

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