The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Object identification as a function of discriminability and learning presentations: the effect of stimulus similarity and canonical frame alignment on aircraft identification

Object identification as a function of discriminability and learning presentations: the effect of stimulus similarity and canonical frame alignment on aircraft identification
Object identification as a function of discriminability and learning presentations: the effect of stimulus similarity and canonical frame alignment on aircraft identification
Aircraft that were relatively similar (homogeneous) and relatively dissimilar (heterogeneous) in appearance were studied at orientations either consistent (canonical) or inconsistent (noncanonical) with the environmental frame of reference. At test, participants' identification performance was measured with stimuli rotated to novel orientations within the picture plane. During learning and testing, identification of heterogeneous aircraft was better than that of homogeneous aircraft. At test, only identification of homogenous aircraft revealed a strong linear degradation of performance as angular disparity between the novel test orientations and the original learning orientations increased. During learning and testing, identification was better for aircraft studied at canonical orientations than for those studied at noncanonical orientations. The results are discussed in terms of object identification, aircraft recognition training, categorization, mental representations, and visual mental rotation.
1076-898X
148-157
Ashworth, Alan R.
cf265132-8f01-4e2b-abf0-204cdd6161d6
Dror, Itiel E.
4d907da2-0a2e-41ed-b927-770a70a35c71
Ashworth, Alan R.
cf265132-8f01-4e2b-abf0-204cdd6161d6
Dror, Itiel E.
4d907da2-0a2e-41ed-b927-770a70a35c71

Ashworth, Alan R. and Dror, Itiel E. (2000) Object identification as a function of discriminability and learning presentations: the effect of stimulus similarity and canonical frame alignment on aircraft identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 6 (2), 148-157.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aircraft that were relatively similar (homogeneous) and relatively dissimilar (heterogeneous) in appearance were studied at orientations either consistent (canonical) or inconsistent (noncanonical) with the environmental frame of reference. At test, participants' identification performance was measured with stimuli rotated to novel orientations within the picture plane. During learning and testing, identification of heterogeneous aircraft was better than that of homogeneous aircraft. At test, only identification of homogenous aircraft revealed a strong linear degradation of performance as angular disparity between the novel test orientations and the original learning orientations increased. During learning and testing, identification was better for aircraft studied at canonical orientations than for those studied at noncanonical orientations. The results are discussed in terms of object identification, aircraft recognition training, categorization, mental representations, and visual mental rotation.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2000

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18351
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18351
ISSN: 1076-898X
PURE UUID: 3dfb672b-e9b9-4ece-b6a9-4e4176f3ad07

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Jan 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:28

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×