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Modelling discrete fragmentation of brittle particles

Modelling discrete fragmentation of brittle particles
Modelling discrete fragmentation of brittle particles
A novel discrete fragmentation method (DFM) for spherical brittle particles using the discrete element method (DEM) has been developed, implemented and validated. Trajectories of individual fragments can be studied from the moment of breakage where the progeny might originate from incremental, simultaneous and/or repetitive fragmentation events. A particle breaks depending on the applied dynamic impact forces from collisions, the damage history, the particle size and material properties. This 3D model requires setting parameters solely dependent on the particle material and is consequently independent of any empirical value. Mass, momentum and energy is conserved during breakage. A theoretically consistent description from the onset of fragmentation to the cloud formation after breakage is provided and model outcomes have been compared to experimental results and other model predictions where very little deviation has been encountered. All material parameters have been varied independently to study the sensitivity of the model under dynamic fragmentation of numerous particles in a semi-autogenous mill.

0032-5910
731-739
Brunchmuller, J.
85a4c922-5ce6-4d96-a8c6-9cc07a81793f
van Wachem, B.G.M
f393865e-91f5-411d-abea-3c596dec4f12
Gu, S.
a6f7af91-4731-46fe-ac4d-3081890ab704
Luo, K.H.
1c9be6c6-e956-4b12-af13-32ea855c69f3
Brunchmuller, J.
85a4c922-5ce6-4d96-a8c6-9cc07a81793f
van Wachem, B.G.M
f393865e-91f5-411d-abea-3c596dec4f12
Gu, S.
a6f7af91-4731-46fe-ac4d-3081890ab704
Luo, K.H.
1c9be6c6-e956-4b12-af13-32ea855c69f3

Brunchmuller, J., van Wachem, B.G.M, Gu, S. and Luo, K.H. (2011) Modelling discrete fragmentation of brittle particles. Powder Technology, 208 (3), 731-739. (doi:10.1016/j.powtec.2011.01.017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A novel discrete fragmentation method (DFM) for spherical brittle particles using the discrete element method (DEM) has been developed, implemented and validated. Trajectories of individual fragments can be studied from the moment of breakage where the progeny might originate from incremental, simultaneous and/or repetitive fragmentation events. A particle breaks depending on the applied dynamic impact forces from collisions, the damage history, the particle size and material properties. This 3D model requires setting parameters solely dependent on the particle material and is consequently independent of any empirical value. Mass, momentum and energy is conserved during breakage. A theoretically consistent description from the onset of fragmentation to the cloud formation after breakage is provided and model outcomes have been compared to experimental results and other model predictions where very little deviation has been encountered. All material parameters have been varied independently to study the sensitivity of the model under dynamic fragmentation of numerous particles in a semi-autogenous mill.

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More information

Published date: 10 April 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 184395
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/184395
ISSN: 0032-5910
PURE UUID: bfcc9160-4ced-40f5-8803-15cef92d2092

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 May 2011 15:39
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:39

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