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Psychological factors influencing recovery from balance disorders

Psychological factors influencing recovery from balance disorders
Psychological factors influencing recovery from balance disorders
This article reviews evidence for three mechanisms whereby psychological factors may aggravate dizziness and retard recovery from balance disorders. Firstly, a common behavioral response to dizziness is to avoid activities and environments that provoke symptoms, yet such avoidance deprives the individual of the exposure necessary to promote psychological and neurophysiological adaptation. Secondly, anxiety arousal and hyperventilation may add to, amplify, and disinhibit the somatic symptoms induced by balance disorder. Thirdly, attention and cognitive load may influence the central processing of information required for the perception and control of orientation. The need to combine physiotherapy for dizziness with psychotherapy is discussed.
vestibular, anxiety, spatial
0887-6185
107-119
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Redfern, Mark S.
4cc816fd-efe7-4459-8703-6a417bf09983
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Redfern, Mark S.
4cc816fd-efe7-4459-8703-6a417bf09983

Yardley, Lucy and Redfern, Mark S. (2001) Psychological factors influencing recovery from balance disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 15 (1-2), 107-119. (doi:10.1016/S0887-6185(00)00045-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article reviews evidence for three mechanisms whereby psychological factors may aggravate dizziness and retard recovery from balance disorders. Firstly, a common behavioral response to dizziness is to avoid activities and environments that provoke symptoms, yet such avoidance deprives the individual of the exposure necessary to promote psychological and neurophysiological adaptation. Secondly, anxiety arousal and hyperventilation may add to, amplify, and disinhibit the somatic symptoms induced by balance disorder. Thirdly, attention and cognitive load may influence the central processing of information required for the perception and control of orientation. The need to combine physiotherapy for dizziness with psychotherapy is discussed.

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More information

Published date: 2001
Keywords: vestibular, anxiety, spatial

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18455
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18455
ISSN: 0887-6185
PURE UUID: 50b064fa-66a3-4d40-8c24-d8fd4bbe85b6
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Dec 2005
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 01:07

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