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Anaerobic digestion of source segregated domestic food waste: performance assessment by mass and energy balance

Anaerobic digestion of source segregated domestic food waste: performance assessment by mass and energy balance
Anaerobic digestion of source segregated domestic food waste: performance assessment by mass and energy balance
An anaerobic digester receiving food waste collected mainly from domestic kitchens was monitored over a period of 426 days. During this time information was gathered on the waste input material, the biogas production, and the digestate characteristics. A mass balance accounted for over 90% of the material entering the plant leaving as gaseous or digestate products. A comprehensive energy balance for the same period showed that for each tonne of input material the potential recoverable energy was 405 kWh. Biogas production in the digester was stable at 642 m3 tonne?1 VS added with a methane content of around 62%. The nitrogen in the food waste input was on average 8.9 kg tonne?1. This led to a high ammonia concentration in the digester which may have been responsible for the accumulation of volatile fatty acids that was also observed.
anaerobic digestion, food waste, energy, biogas, mass balance
0960-8524
612-620
Banks, Charles J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Chesshire, Michael
b2918637-7c74-483a-b696-62100fd450d0
Heaven, Sonia
f25f74b6-97bd-4a18-b33b-a63084718571
Arnold, Rebecca
cb86809c-bc25-48c5-9b60-f9fa895bca1b
Banks, Charles J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Chesshire, Michael
b2918637-7c74-483a-b696-62100fd450d0
Heaven, Sonia
f25f74b6-97bd-4a18-b33b-a63084718571
Arnold, Rebecca
cb86809c-bc25-48c5-9b60-f9fa895bca1b

Banks, Charles J., Chesshire, Michael, Heaven, Sonia and Arnold, Rebecca (2011) Anaerobic digestion of source segregated domestic food waste: performance assessment by mass and energy balance. Bioresource Technology, 102 (2), 612-620. (doi:10.1016/j.biortech.2010.08.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

An anaerobic digester receiving food waste collected mainly from domestic kitchens was monitored over a period of 426 days. During this time information was gathered on the waste input material, the biogas production, and the digestate characteristics. A mass balance accounted for over 90% of the material entering the plant leaving as gaseous or digestate products. A comprehensive energy balance for the same period showed that for each tonne of input material the potential recoverable energy was 405 kWh. Biogas production in the digester was stable at 642 m3 tonne?1 VS added with a methane content of around 62%. The nitrogen in the food waste input was on average 8.9 kg tonne?1. This led to a high ammonia concentration in the digester which may have been responsible for the accumulation of volatile fatty acids that was also observed.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 August 2010
Published date: January 2011
Keywords: anaerobic digestion, food waste, energy, biogas, mass balance
Organisations: Civil Engineering & the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 184679
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/184679
ISSN: 0960-8524
PURE UUID: 72af361c-d127-447c-9cb4-7f8a98730db4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 May 2011 10:52
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:51

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