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The effects of alcohol cue exposure on non-dependent drinkers' attentional bias for alcohol-related stimuli

The effects of alcohol cue exposure on non-dependent drinkers' attentional bias for alcohol-related stimuli
The effects of alcohol cue exposure on non-dependent drinkers' attentional bias for alcohol-related stimuli
Aims: The effects of university students’ habitual drinking practices and experimental alcohol cue exposure on their attentional bias for alcohol-related stimuli were assessed.
Methods: Participants were exposed in vivo to either an alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage immediately prior to completing a cognitively demanding emotional Stroop task that uses alcohol-related and control words as potential distractors.
Results: Regression analyses indicated that, for participants who were low consumers of alcohol, neither level of habitual drinking, type of cue exposure, nor their interaction predicted attentional bias for the alcohol-related stimuli. For high consumers of alcohol who were exposed to the alcoholic beverage (but not those exposed to the non-alcoholic beverage), the amount of alcohol that participants habitually drank significantly predicted the degree of attentional bias.
Conclusions: The results indicate that, among non-dependent drinkers (unlike alcohol-dependent participants), alcohol-related attentional bias is not a generalized phenomenon, but occurs only under a specific set of circumstances.
0735-0414
45-49
Cox, W. Miles
6a364918-750a-4c98-9d6c-fe734993d5f0
Brown, Michael A.
1cc7e495-9e3c-4e72-979a-978ea9851107
Rowlands, Lisa J.
ca9ad9f2-f89c-4600-b3b2-0db62ab34f9d
Cox, W. Miles
6a364918-750a-4c98-9d6c-fe734993d5f0
Brown, Michael A.
1cc7e495-9e3c-4e72-979a-978ea9851107
Rowlands, Lisa J.
ca9ad9f2-f89c-4600-b3b2-0db62ab34f9d

Cox, W. Miles, Brown, Michael A. and Rowlands, Lisa J. (2003) The effects of alcohol cue exposure on non-dependent drinkers' attentional bias for alcohol-related stimuli. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 38 (1), 45-49. (doi:10.1093/alcalc/agg010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aims: The effects of university students’ habitual drinking practices and experimental alcohol cue exposure on their attentional bias for alcohol-related stimuli were assessed.
Methods: Participants were exposed in vivo to either an alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage immediately prior to completing a cognitively demanding emotional Stroop task that uses alcohol-related and control words as potential distractors.
Results: Regression analyses indicated that, for participants who were low consumers of alcohol, neither level of habitual drinking, type of cue exposure, nor their interaction predicted attentional bias for the alcohol-related stimuli. For high consumers of alcohol who were exposed to the alcoholic beverage (but not those exposed to the non-alcoholic beverage), the amount of alcohol that participants habitually drank significantly predicted the degree of attentional bias.
Conclusions: The results indicate that, among non-dependent drinkers (unlike alcohol-dependent participants), alcohol-related attentional bias is not a generalized phenomenon, but occurs only under a specific set of circumstances.

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Published date: January 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18469
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18469
ISSN: 0735-0414
PURE UUID: e0499e7b-9fe6-4ece-b598-89f12f9eccdf

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Date deposited: 15 Dec 2005
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 19:15

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