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Flavour conditioning and alcohol: a multilevel model of individual differences

Flavour conditioning and alcohol: a multilevel model of individual differences
Flavour conditioning and alcohol: a multilevel model of individual differences
Previous research shows that dependent drinkers respond more strongly to alcohol-related cues and suggests that alcohol cue-reactivity may be relevant to understanding dependence liability. However, a significant weakness in many studies is the fact that cue-reactivity is studied without actually conditioning subjects; responses to alcohol-related cues are simply assumed to be conditioned responses. The current report attempts to overcome this weakness by studying alcohol cue-reactivity following a flavour-conditioning procedure. A statistical model of individual differences in cue-reactivity was constructed using previous alcohol exposure, alcohol tolerance, and personality as predictor variables. Although there was no evidence for overall differences in subjective and psychophysiological responses to alcohol and soft-drink paired flavours, there were marked individual differences in responding to the different flavours. The statistical model showed that reward sensitivity (high extroversion, high neuroticism), heavier levels of drinking, and higher levels of tolerance to the intoxicating effects of alcohol were associated with lower levels of skin conductance in the presence of alcohol paired flavours.
alcohol, drugs, dependence, personality, drinking history, alcohol tolerance, cues, multilevel statistical models
0301-0511
17-36
Glautier, Steven
964468b2-3ad7-40cc-b4be-e35c7dee518f
Bankart, John
86de6365-2bf4-48c8-ab23-f5d233ae21c2
Williams, Ann
9cc09f36-22cb-422d-a79e-8b3eab1bdb49
Glautier, Steven
964468b2-3ad7-40cc-b4be-e35c7dee518f
Bankart, John
86de6365-2bf4-48c8-ab23-f5d233ae21c2
Williams, Ann
9cc09f36-22cb-422d-a79e-8b3eab1bdb49

Glautier, Steven, Bankart, John and Williams, Ann (2000) Flavour conditioning and alcohol: a multilevel model of individual differences. Biological Psychology, 52 (1), 17-36. (doi:10.1016/S0301-0511(99)00022-8).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Previous research shows that dependent drinkers respond more strongly to alcohol-related cues and suggests that alcohol cue-reactivity may be relevant to understanding dependence liability. However, a significant weakness in many studies is the fact that cue-reactivity is studied without actually conditioning subjects; responses to alcohol-related cues are simply assumed to be conditioned responses. The current report attempts to overcome this weakness by studying alcohol cue-reactivity following a flavour-conditioning procedure. A statistical model of individual differences in cue-reactivity was constructed using previous alcohol exposure, alcohol tolerance, and personality as predictor variables. Although there was no evidence for overall differences in subjective and psychophysiological responses to alcohol and soft-drink paired flavours, there were marked individual differences in responding to the different flavours. The statistical model showed that reward sensitivity (high extroversion, high neuroticism), heavier levels of drinking, and higher levels of tolerance to the intoxicating effects of alcohol were associated with lower levels of skin conductance in the presence of alcohol paired flavours.

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More information

Published date: 2000
Keywords: alcohol, drugs, dependence, personality, drinking history, alcohol tolerance, cues, multilevel statistical models

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 18594
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18594
ISSN: 0301-0511
PURE UUID: 0e89ff58-b4af-47eb-9189-1e3087ef2090

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Dec 2005
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:35

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Contributors

Author: Steven Glautier
Author: John Bankart
Author: Ann Williams

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