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Contribution of job strain to nurses’ consideration of leaving the profession - results from the longitudinal European nurses’ early exit study

Contribution of job strain to nurses’ consideration of leaving the profession - results from the longitudinal European nurses’ early exit study
Contribution of job strain to nurses’ consideration of leaving the profession - results from the longitudinal European nurses’ early exit study
Objectives The role of work characteristics was assessed, as operationalized by the demand–control model with respect to nurses’ intent to leave their profession, using data from the European nurses’ early exit (NEXT) study.

Methods Data from a self-report questionnaire filled out by 11 606 registered nurses who worked in hospitals in eight European countries and who had participated in both the NEXT baseline assessment (2002–2003) and the NEXT follow-up assessment (2003–2004) were used.

Results The countries varied substantially as regards demands, influence, and intent to leave the profession. The variables also varied considerably over time within the countries. Among the nurses not considering leaving the profession in 2002–2003, those initially not exposed to job strain (high demands and low influence) but exposed 1 year later had a 2.7-fold higher risk of considering to leave the profession [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.1–3.4, multivariate logistic regression analysis, adjusted for potential confounders) when compared with the reference group (no job strain both times). The nurses with job strain in both assessments showed a 2.3-fold higher risk (95% CI 1.8–2.9). No increased risk was found for those with job strain in the first assessment but not in the second assessment. The findings were similar for most countries.

Conclusions The considerable variability of the job demand–control indicators assessed during the 12-month period may imply a potential for improvement. The results emphasize the importance of changes in job strain in determining fluctuations in nurses’ considerations of leaving their profession, even over a short period.

demand–control model, early exit, early exit study, europe, job strain, longitudinal study, next study, nurse, nurses’ early exit study, profession, turnover
0355-3140
75-82
Hasselhorn, H.M.
3395b427-5eb0-431e-bf94-53213c62f847
Conway, P.M.
d4845327-786a-453b-9a87-18fed7a598c9
Widerszal-Bazyl, M.
befec3d7-d8c5-455c-84a7-dd85f12318b6
Simon, M.
6e9ad30e-c22f-455a-945e-98d77dcec479
Tackenberg, P.
e477535d-589f-41d0-812c-a4970ff316ce
Schmidt, S.
02053176-9380-4830-afe3-4313748747da
Camerino, D.
9a36bbde-cd42-4279-b0e3-ffc6796fff70
Müller, B.H.
5eb3d70c-78be-4967-b64c-c1ca53a8b73f
NEXT-Study-Group
Hasselhorn, H.M.
3395b427-5eb0-431e-bf94-53213c62f847
Conway, P.M.
d4845327-786a-453b-9a87-18fed7a598c9
Widerszal-Bazyl, M.
befec3d7-d8c5-455c-84a7-dd85f12318b6
Simon, M.
6e9ad30e-c22f-455a-945e-98d77dcec479
Tackenberg, P.
e477535d-589f-41d0-812c-a4970ff316ce
Schmidt, S.
02053176-9380-4830-afe3-4313748747da
Camerino, D.
9a36bbde-cd42-4279-b0e3-ffc6796fff70
Müller, B.H.
5eb3d70c-78be-4967-b64c-c1ca53a8b73f

Hasselhorn, H.M., Conway, P.M., Widerszal-Bazyl, M., Simon, M., Tackenberg, P., Schmidt, S., Camerino, D. and Müller, B.H. , NEXT-Study-Group (2008) Contribution of job strain to nurses’ consideration of leaving the profession - results from the longitudinal European nurses’ early exit study. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, 6, 75-82.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives The role of work characteristics was assessed, as operationalized by the demand–control model with respect to nurses’ intent to leave their profession, using data from the European nurses’ early exit (NEXT) study.

Methods Data from a self-report questionnaire filled out by 11 606 registered nurses who worked in hospitals in eight European countries and who had participated in both the NEXT baseline assessment (2002–2003) and the NEXT follow-up assessment (2003–2004) were used.

Results The countries varied substantially as regards demands, influence, and intent to leave the profession. The variables also varied considerably over time within the countries. Among the nurses not considering leaving the profession in 2002–2003, those initially not exposed to job strain (high demands and low influence) but exposed 1 year later had a 2.7-fold higher risk of considering to leave the profession [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.1–3.4, multivariate logistic regression analysis, adjusted for potential confounders) when compared with the reference group (no job strain both times). The nurses with job strain in both assessments showed a 2.3-fold higher risk (95% CI 1.8–2.9). No increased risk was found for those with job strain in the first assessment but not in the second assessment. The findings were similar for most countries.

Conclusions The considerable variability of the job demand–control indicators assessed during the 12-month period may imply a potential for improvement. The results emphasize the importance of changes in job strain in determining fluctuations in nurses’ considerations of leaving their profession, even over a short period.

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Published date: 2008
Keywords: demand–control model, early exit, early exit study, europe, job strain, longitudinal study, next study, nurse, nurses’ early exit study, profession, turnover

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Local EPrints ID: 186171
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/186171
ISSN: 0355-3140
PURE UUID: c8f59979-a6e0-4423-a99c-40e66a629588

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Date deposited: 12 May 2011 13:18
Last modified: 16 Sep 2019 18:48

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Contributors

Author: H.M. Hasselhorn
Author: P.M. Conway
Author: M. Widerszal-Bazyl
Author: M. Simon
Author: P. Tackenberg
Author: S. Schmidt
Author: D. Camerino
Author: B.H. Müller

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