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Prevalence of skin disease in the nursing profession - results from the European NEXT-Study

Prevalence of skin disease in the nursing profession - results from the European NEXT-Study
Prevalence of skin disease in the nursing profession - results from the European NEXT-Study
Skin diseases constitute a major Occupational disease in nursing. Established risks include exposure to latex, chemicals and wet work. The NEXT-Study investigated working conditions among European nurses. In this secondary analysis of NEXT self-report questionnaire data, work factors are investigated with respect to their association with "physician diagnosed current skin disease". Data from 28,726 nurses from nine countries were analysed. On average 15.3% of all participants reported skin disease (range: 11.3%, Norway to 19.3%, France). Multivariate LogReg analysis revealed a significantly increased risk for women (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.70), nightshift workers (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.10-1.58), quantitative demands (medium demands OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.13-1.35; high demands OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.47) and influence at work (medium influence OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.19; low influence OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.23). No consistent associations were found for institution, age, qualification, seniority and working hours. Multivariate models for each country tended to confirm overall findings. The findings indicate that still today skin diseases are a frequent burden for nurses. While there is wide absence of identification of structural and socio-epidemiological risks, the psychosocial work environment may constitute another Occupational risk factor besides those established. Observational studies might identify risk procedures or risk behaviour under high psychosocial workload.
nursing, skin disease, occupational disease, psychosocial factors, self report
0137-4990
271-283
Hasselhorn, Hans Martin
f1c81ea4-92ae-4a15-8254-0ba309847c9d
Simon, Michael
6e9ad30e-c22f-455a-945e-98d77dcec479
Nienhaus, Albert
eb8b2d84-ee0d-4997-9357-fae458f959ad
Dulon, Madeleine
d8f2c42c-55b4-42f5-902b-e2e5211595e9
Schmidt, Sascha
c4236160-6167-4e55-bce9-2c45eb39154c
Müller, Bernd Hans
3cd86913-0147-49db-bc73-ecc416df5e3d
Hasselhorn, Hans Martin
f1c81ea4-92ae-4a15-8254-0ba309847c9d
Simon, Michael
6e9ad30e-c22f-455a-945e-98d77dcec479
Nienhaus, Albert
eb8b2d84-ee0d-4997-9357-fae458f959ad
Dulon, Madeleine
d8f2c42c-55b4-42f5-902b-e2e5211595e9
Schmidt, Sascha
c4236160-6167-4e55-bce9-2c45eb39154c
Müller, Bernd Hans
3cd86913-0147-49db-bc73-ecc416df5e3d

Hasselhorn, Hans Martin, Simon, Michael, Nienhaus, Albert, Dulon, Madeleine, Schmidt, Sascha and Müller, Bernd Hans (2008) Prevalence of skin disease in the nursing profession - results from the European NEXT-Study. Ergonomia, 30 (4), 271-283.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Skin diseases constitute a major Occupational disease in nursing. Established risks include exposure to latex, chemicals and wet work. The NEXT-Study investigated working conditions among European nurses. In this secondary analysis of NEXT self-report questionnaire data, work factors are investigated with respect to their association with "physician diagnosed current skin disease". Data from 28,726 nurses from nine countries were analysed. On average 15.3% of all participants reported skin disease (range: 11.3%, Norway to 19.3%, France). Multivariate LogReg analysis revealed a significantly increased risk for women (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.70), nightshift workers (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.10-1.58), quantitative demands (medium demands OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.13-1.35; high demands OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.47) and influence at work (medium influence OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.19; low influence OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.23). No consistent associations were found for institution, age, qualification, seniority and working hours. Multivariate models for each country tended to confirm overall findings. The findings indicate that still today skin diseases are a frequent burden for nurses. While there is wide absence of identification of structural and socio-epidemiological risks, the psychosocial work environment may constitute another Occupational risk factor besides those established. Observational studies might identify risk procedures or risk behaviour under high psychosocial workload.

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More information

Published date: October 2008
Keywords: nursing, skin disease, occupational disease, psychosocial factors, self report
Organisations: Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 186191
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/186191
ISSN: 0137-4990
PURE UUID: c1d3416a-1114-4f66-981f-4babc780b4c3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 May 2011 14:13
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:48

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Contributors

Author: Hans Martin Hasselhorn
Author: Michael Simon
Author: Albert Nienhaus
Author: Madeleine Dulon
Author: Sascha Schmidt
Author: Bernd Hans Müller

University divisions

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