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Void fraction measurements and scale effects in breaking waves in freshwater and seawater

Void fraction measurements and scale effects in breaking waves in freshwater and seawater
Void fraction measurements and scale effects in breaking waves in freshwater and seawater
This paper follows from the work of Blenkinsopp and Chaplin (2007) and describes detailed measurements of the time-varying distribution of void fractions generated by breaking waves in freshwater, artificial seawater and natural seawater under laboratory conditions, along with flow visualisation of the entrainment process. The measurements were made with highly sensitive optical fibre phase detection probes and the results demonstrate that although an additional population of fine (d < 0.3 mm) bubbles existed in the seawater cases, the total volume and distribution of entrained air, and the spatial and temporal evolution of the bubble plumes were very similar in all three water types. The influence of water type may be relatively insignificant, but a numerical bubble tracking model shows that the effect of scale is an important consideration when modelling the post-entrainment evolution of breaker-entrained bubble plumes. Consequently the results suggest that while the use of freshwater in laboratory models of oceanic processes can be considered valid in most situations, the effect of scale may impact interpretation of the results.
breaking waves, air entrainment, bubble plumes, seawater, void fraction, scale effects
0378-3839
417-428
Blenkinsopp, C.E.
667e2a73-0488-4e5d-9eda-d58526fbc8c6
Chaplin, J.R.
d5ed2ba9-df16-4a19-ab9d-32da7883309f
Blenkinsopp, C.E.
667e2a73-0488-4e5d-9eda-d58526fbc8c6
Chaplin, J.R.
d5ed2ba9-df16-4a19-ab9d-32da7883309f

Blenkinsopp, C.E. and Chaplin, J.R. (2011) Void fraction measurements and scale effects in breaking waves in freshwater and seawater. Coastal Engineering, 58 (5), 417-428. (doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2010.12.006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper follows from the work of Blenkinsopp and Chaplin (2007) and describes detailed measurements of the time-varying distribution of void fractions generated by breaking waves in freshwater, artificial seawater and natural seawater under laboratory conditions, along with flow visualisation of the entrainment process. The measurements were made with highly sensitive optical fibre phase detection probes and the results demonstrate that although an additional population of fine (d < 0.3 mm) bubbles existed in the seawater cases, the total volume and distribution of entrained air, and the spatial and temporal evolution of the bubble plumes were very similar in all three water types. The influence of water type may be relatively insignificant, but a numerical bubble tracking model shows that the effect of scale is an important consideration when modelling the post-entrainment evolution of breaker-entrained bubble plumes. Consequently the results suggest that while the use of freshwater in laboratory models of oceanic processes can be considered valid in most situations, the effect of scale may impact interpretation of the results.

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Published date: May 2011
Keywords: breaking waves, air entrainment, bubble plumes, seawater, void fraction, scale effects

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 186223
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/186223
ISSN: 0378-3839
PURE UUID: 57885310-8068-49d2-8148-11fbf5766219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 May 2011 15:17
Last modified: 28 Oct 2019 21:36

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