The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

By royal appointment: The country look

By royal appointment: The country look
By royal appointment: The country look
The British may not have a national costume but if they did it would be the country look: tweeds, tartans and florals, and timeless classics like the trench coat and waxed jacket. From Burberry to Barbour, it's no accident that a country obsessed with the weather has become a market leader in clothes designed to repel the wind and rain.

Although styled not for fashion but practicality, the look has nonetheless been endlessly appealing to designers like Christopher Bailey who, backstage at the Milan fashion show, demonstrates how he has reinvented the trench coat. In London, Luella Bartley walks us through her collection of floral print dresses, a modern take on Laura Ashley, and rock star Eric Clapton illustrates why the cut of a country jacket is more about purpose than style.

The most famous fan of country attire has been the Queen and it is her 'at leisure' look of tartans and headscarves that is now providing the inspiration for Italian designers Dolce and Gabbana. It is perhaps no surprise that that these comforting and practical clothes, the embodiment of tradition, protectiveness and durability, are back in fashion as the ill winds of recession blow.
4
BBC2
Faiers, Jonathan
6d0c4db1-8d10-48c4-875e-4e60b94f300d
Coyle, Richard
2771a823-c959-46c8-8958-cb1d041503b4
Faiers, Jonathan
6d0c4db1-8d10-48c4-875e-4e60b94f300d
Coyle, Richard
2771a823-c959-46c8-8958-cb1d041503b4

Faiers, Jonathan and Coyle, Richard (2008) By royal appointment: The country look (British Style Genius, 4) BBC2

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

The British may not have a national costume but if they did it would be the country look: tweeds, tartans and florals, and timeless classics like the trench coat and waxed jacket. From Burberry to Barbour, it's no accident that a country obsessed with the weather has become a market leader in clothes designed to repel the wind and rain.

Although styled not for fashion but practicality, the look has nonetheless been endlessly appealing to designers like Christopher Bailey who, backstage at the Milan fashion show, demonstrates how he has reinvented the trench coat. In London, Luella Bartley walks us through her collection of floral print dresses, a modern take on Laura Ashley, and rock star Eric Clapton illustrates why the cut of a country jacket is more about purpose than style.

The most famous fan of country attire has been the Queen and it is her 'at leisure' look of tartans and headscarves that is now providing the inspiration for Italian designers Dolce and Gabbana. It is perhaps no surprise that that these comforting and practical clothes, the embodiment of tradition, protectiveness and durability, are back in fashion as the ill winds of recession blow.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 28 October 2008
Additional Information: Various repeat broadcasts on BBC2 and BBC1 and pod casts.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 187097
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/187097
PURE UUID: 67af2818-0b79-43bb-99f0-6088d599b073

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 May 2011 13:06
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:46

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×