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Development of a tracheostomy scoring system to guide airway management after major head and neck surgery

Development of a tracheostomy scoring system to guide airway management after major head and neck surgery
Development of a tracheostomy scoring system to guide airway management after major head and neck surgery
The use of elective tracheostomy in major head and neck surgery is well established, although practice varies between units. There is no published method that reliably predicts the need for tracheostomy. This paper describes the development of a surgical scoring system designed to achieve that aim. The system was devised using data obtained retrospectively from 148 consecutive major head and neck procedures. These procedures were grouped according to the airway management plan in place at the end of the procedure: elective extubation (group E, 52 procedures, 50 patients); elective overnight ventilation via an endotracheal tube (group ETT, 55 procedures, 52 patients); and elective overnight ventilation via a tracheostomy (group T, 41 procedures, 41 patients). 8 patients from group ETT required a late tracheostomy for either medical or surgical indications. Using statistical methods, a threshold score was defined above which the high risk of upper airway obstruction should prompt consideration of an elective tracheostomy
0901-5027
846-849
Cameron, M.
a7987341-45e8-481f-9154-02a48c53b20c
Corner, A.
636a8ae0-921f-43a2-9573-9bd42b817827
Diba, A.
30c92071-ee8f-415a-8eee-7813cb0b452e
Hankins, M.
ce4b7d68-3320-4af4-9dd7-3537a4b07219
Cameron, M.
a7987341-45e8-481f-9154-02a48c53b20c
Corner, A.
636a8ae0-921f-43a2-9573-9bd42b817827
Diba, A.
30c92071-ee8f-415a-8eee-7813cb0b452e
Hankins, M.
ce4b7d68-3320-4af4-9dd7-3537a4b07219

Cameron, M., Corner, A., Diba, A. and Hankins, M. (2009) Development of a tracheostomy scoring system to guide airway management after major head and neck surgery. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 38 (8), 846-849. (doi:10.1016/j.ijom.2009.03.713).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The use of elective tracheostomy in major head and neck surgery is well established, although practice varies between units. There is no published method that reliably predicts the need for tracheostomy. This paper describes the development of a surgical scoring system designed to achieve that aim. The system was devised using data obtained retrospectively from 148 consecutive major head and neck procedures. These procedures were grouped according to the airway management plan in place at the end of the procedure: elective extubation (group E, 52 procedures, 50 patients); elective overnight ventilation via an endotracheal tube (group ETT, 55 procedures, 52 patients); and elective overnight ventilation via a tracheostomy (group T, 41 procedures, 41 patients). 8 patients from group ETT required a late tracheostomy for either medical or surgical indications. Using statistical methods, a threshold score was defined above which the high risk of upper airway obstruction should prompt consideration of an elective tracheostomy

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Published date: August 2009
Organisations: Education, Health Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 187323
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/187323
ISSN: 0901-5027
PURE UUID: abc6a8ae-08c7-4817-a6d5-d1879cbe9c10

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Date deposited: 17 May 2011 13:12
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:46

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