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Self-sampling for oropharyngeal and rectal specimens to screen for sexually transmitted infections: acceptability among men who have sex with men

Self-sampling for oropharyngeal and rectal specimens to screen for sexually transmitted infections: acceptability among men who have sex with men
Self-sampling for oropharyngeal and rectal specimens to screen for sexually transmitted infections: acceptability among men who have sex with men
Objectives: To explore the feasibility and acceptability of self-sampling for oropharyngeal and rectal specimens to screen for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among men who have sex with men (MSM). Participant’s willingness to self-sample at home was also explored.

Methods: Participants of a study to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of self versus nurse taken oropharyngeal and rectal specimens were surveyed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of self-sampling using specimen collection methods (gargle, OraSure mouth pad to collect oropharyngeal specimens and APTIMA unisex swabs to collect rectal and pharyngeal specimens). Acceptability was measured using a five-point Likert-type response scale (for example, 1?=? strongly disagree; 5?=? strongly agree). Open-ended questions explored participants’ experiences of self-sampling.

Results: Of 334 eligible MSM, 301 (90%) participated in the study. Altogether, 301 participants self-sampled using gargle and rectal and pharyngeal swabs and 288 using mouth pad. Complete questionnaire data from 274 participants showed that feasibility and acceptability of self-sampling using gargle and mouth pad was higher (92%) than pharyngeal swabs (76%). Rectal swabs were acceptable to 82% participants. Despite some discomfort and difficulty in using swabs, 76% were willing to use all four methods for self-sampling in the future. Home sampling was acceptable (84%) as it was perceived to be less intrusive and more convenient than a clinic visit and likely to reduce genitourinary medicine (GUM) waiting time.

Conclusions: Self-sampling for rectal and oropharyngeal specimens is feasible and acceptable to MSM. Self-sampling can be offered as an alternative to clinic-based testing and has the potential to improve choice, access and uptake of screening for STIs.

1368-4973
60-64
Wayal, S.
fbbb3b1d-5c2c-4252-80d9-7058914b6728
Llewellyn, C.
867b1d97-fdd2-4230-84a5-36db0ab6361f
Smith, H.
cc42a332-71ec-436f-8207-9151275a92d8
Hankins, M.
ce4b7d68-3320-4af4-9dd7-3537a4b07219
Phillips, A.
3f6d00b5-fb3c-423b-976d-83f22a2dc47b
Richardson, D.
9dedf3b7-54a6-4068-b9ba-f71b70b1d813
Fisher, M.
1ba6a9e9-9021-4c95-8423-4f04c52b6f9e
Wayal, S.
fbbb3b1d-5c2c-4252-80d9-7058914b6728
Llewellyn, C.
867b1d97-fdd2-4230-84a5-36db0ab6361f
Smith, H.
cc42a332-71ec-436f-8207-9151275a92d8
Hankins, M.
ce4b7d68-3320-4af4-9dd7-3537a4b07219
Phillips, A.
3f6d00b5-fb3c-423b-976d-83f22a2dc47b
Richardson, D.
9dedf3b7-54a6-4068-b9ba-f71b70b1d813
Fisher, M.
1ba6a9e9-9021-4c95-8423-4f04c52b6f9e

Wayal, S., Llewellyn, C., Smith, H., Hankins, M., Phillips, A., Richardson, D. and Fisher, M. (2009) Self-sampling for oropharyngeal and rectal specimens to screen for sexually transmitted infections: acceptability among men who have sex with men. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 85 (1), 60-64. (doi:10.1136/sti.2008.032193). (PMID:18708480)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: To explore the feasibility and acceptability of self-sampling for oropharyngeal and rectal specimens to screen for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among men who have sex with men (MSM). Participant’s willingness to self-sample at home was also explored.

Methods: Participants of a study to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of self versus nurse taken oropharyngeal and rectal specimens were surveyed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of self-sampling using specimen collection methods (gargle, OraSure mouth pad to collect oropharyngeal specimens and APTIMA unisex swabs to collect rectal and pharyngeal specimens). Acceptability was measured using a five-point Likert-type response scale (for example, 1?=? strongly disagree; 5?=? strongly agree). Open-ended questions explored participants’ experiences of self-sampling.

Results: Of 334 eligible MSM, 301 (90%) participated in the study. Altogether, 301 participants self-sampled using gargle and rectal and pharyngeal swabs and 288 using mouth pad. Complete questionnaire data from 274 participants showed that feasibility and acceptability of self-sampling using gargle and mouth pad was higher (92%) than pharyngeal swabs (76%). Rectal swabs were acceptable to 82% participants. Despite some discomfort and difficulty in using swabs, 76% were willing to use all four methods for self-sampling in the future. Home sampling was acceptable (84%) as it was perceived to be less intrusive and more convenient than a clinic visit and likely to reduce genitourinary medicine (GUM) waiting time.

Conclusions: Self-sampling for rectal and oropharyngeal specimens is feasible and acceptable to MSM. Self-sampling can be offered as an alternative to clinic-based testing and has the potential to improve choice, access and uptake of screening for STIs.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 15 August 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 187343
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/187343
ISSN: 1368-4973
PURE UUID: 0f05829b-2400-4cf8-9af6-cc51686502cf

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Date deposited: 17 May 2011 09:03
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:36

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