The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Phenological changes in intertidal con-specific gastropods in response to climate warming

Phenological changes in intertidal con-specific gastropods in response to climate warming
Phenological changes in intertidal con-specific gastropods in response to climate warming
There is substantial evidence from terrestrial and freshwater systems of species responding to climate change through changes in their phenology. In the marine environment, however, there is less evidence. Using historic (1946–1949) and contemporary (2003–2007) data, collected from rocky shores of south-west Britain, we investigated the affect of recent climate warming on the reproductive phenology of two con-specific intertidal limpet grazers, with cool/boreal and warm/lusitanian centres of distribution. Reproductive development in the southern limpet, Patella depressa, has advanced, on average, 10.2 days per decade since the 1940s, with a longer reproductive season and more of the population reproductively active. The peak in the proportion of the population in advanced stages of gonad development was positively correlated with sea surface temperature (SST) in late spring/early summer, which has increased between the 1940s and 2000s. The advance in peak reproductive development of this species is double the average observed for terrestrial and freshwater systems and indicates, along with other studies, that marine species may be responding faster to climate warming. In contrast, the northern limpet, Patella vulgata, has experienced a delay in the timing of its reproductive development (on average 3.3 days per decade), as well as an increase in reproductive failure years and a reduction in the proportion of the population reaching advanced gonad stages. These results are the first to demonstrate a delay in the reproductive development of a cool-temperate, winter spawner, towards cooler more favourable environmental conditions in response to climate warming. Such a delay in spawning will potentially lead to trophic miss-matches, resulting in a rapid nonlinear decline of this species.
biogeographic distribution, climate change, leading edge, limpets, phenology, rocky intertidal, time-series, trailing edge
1354-1013
709-719
Moore, Pippa J.
f72a6bd0-79f4-41d2-b81b-84e86fd98ff6
Thompson, Richard C.
f439ea56-b6dd-48cf-8adb-d9c2ecc6e24d
Hawkins, Stephen J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Moore, Pippa J.
f72a6bd0-79f4-41d2-b81b-84e86fd98ff6
Thompson, Richard C.
f439ea56-b6dd-48cf-8adb-d9c2ecc6e24d
Hawkins, Stephen J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa

Moore, Pippa J., Thompson, Richard C. and Hawkins, Stephen J. (2011) Phenological changes in intertidal con-specific gastropods in response to climate warming. Global Change Biology, 17 (2), 709-719. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02270.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is substantial evidence from terrestrial and freshwater systems of species responding to climate change through changes in their phenology. In the marine environment, however, there is less evidence. Using historic (1946–1949) and contemporary (2003–2007) data, collected from rocky shores of south-west Britain, we investigated the affect of recent climate warming on the reproductive phenology of two con-specific intertidal limpet grazers, with cool/boreal and warm/lusitanian centres of distribution. Reproductive development in the southern limpet, Patella depressa, has advanced, on average, 10.2 days per decade since the 1940s, with a longer reproductive season and more of the population reproductively active. The peak in the proportion of the population in advanced stages of gonad development was positively correlated with sea surface temperature (SST) in late spring/early summer, which has increased between the 1940s and 2000s. The advance in peak reproductive development of this species is double the average observed for terrestrial and freshwater systems and indicates, along with other studies, that marine species may be responding faster to climate warming. In contrast, the northern limpet, Patella vulgata, has experienced a delay in the timing of its reproductive development (on average 3.3 days per decade), as well as an increase in reproductive failure years and a reduction in the proportion of the population reaching advanced gonad stages. These results are the first to demonstrate a delay in the reproductive development of a cool-temperate, winter spawner, towards cooler more favourable environmental conditions in response to climate warming. Such a delay in spawning will potentially lead to trophic miss-matches, resulting in a rapid nonlinear decline of this species.

Text
Moore_etal_2011_GCB.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 2011
Keywords: biogeographic distribution, climate change, leading edge, limpets, phenology, rocky intertidal, time-series, trailing edge

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 187739
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/187739
ISSN: 1354-1013
PURE UUID: b759a5ac-2ce3-4214-8fe2-9f4da805f91d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 May 2011 09:12
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 21:54

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Pippa J. Moore
Author: Richard C. Thompson

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×