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The role of attachment in emotion regulation of traumatic stress

The role of attachment in emotion regulation of traumatic stress
The role of attachment in emotion regulation of traumatic stress
Recent research has shown that there is a positive relationship between insecure attachment and psychopathology (van IJzendoorn, Bakermans-Kranenburg & Juffer, 2008). However, there is little evidence for the effect of attachment on emotion regulation of traumatic stress. In my first study I examined whether the following variables were protective or risk factors for PTSD or facilitators of posttraumatic growth: adult attachment dimensions, early traumas, self-esteem, and posttraumatic cognitions. I found that individuals with more early traumas, high attachment anxiety, low self-esteem and more negative posttraumatic cognitions exhibited more PTSD symptoms. Furthermore, there was a positive association between low attachment avoidance and posttraumatic growth and between PTSD and PTG. In the second study, I adopted a psychobiological perspective to investigate the effect of oxytocin and secure attachment priming in emotion regulation of trauma in an analogue trauma paradigm (using trauma films). I found that those in the secure versus control neutral prime condition reported more felt-security and happiness. However, both secure priming and oxytocin did not reduce negative mood, trauma intrusions and heart-rate following the trauma film clips. Both studies provide support for the effect of attachment in emotion regulation of traumatic stress.
Arikan, Gizem
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Arikan, Gizem
514acf15-2f76-44f3-a88a-b1ec6dbc752e
KARL, ANKE
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Carnalley, Kathy
ced614cc-38f6-453e-af32-5f2d5be17d3b
Stopa, Lusia
b52f29fc-d1c2-450d-b321-68f95fa22c40

Arikan, Gizem (2011) The role of attachment in emotion regulation of traumatic stress. University of Southampton, School of Psychology, Doctoral Thesis, 249pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Recent research has shown that there is a positive relationship between insecure attachment and psychopathology (van IJzendoorn, Bakermans-Kranenburg & Juffer, 2008). However, there is little evidence for the effect of attachment on emotion regulation of traumatic stress. In my first study I examined whether the following variables were protective or risk factors for PTSD or facilitators of posttraumatic growth: adult attachment dimensions, early traumas, self-esteem, and posttraumatic cognitions. I found that individuals with more early traumas, high attachment anxiety, low self-esteem and more negative posttraumatic cognitions exhibited more PTSD symptoms. Furthermore, there was a positive association between low attachment avoidance and posttraumatic growth and between PTSD and PTG. In the second study, I adopted a psychobiological perspective to investigate the effect of oxytocin and secure attachment priming in emotion regulation of trauma in an analogue trauma paradigm (using trauma films). I found that those in the secure versus control neutral prime condition reported more felt-security and happiness. However, both secure priming and oxytocin did not reduce negative mood, trauma intrusions and heart-rate following the trauma film clips. Both studies provide support for the effect of attachment in emotion regulation of traumatic stress.

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Published date: November 2011
Organisations: University of Southampton

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Local EPrints ID: 188699
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/188699
PURE UUID: 77987fac-7120-4df2-9ddb-4addb417d49e

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Date deposited: 31 May 2011 10:36
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:42

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