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The 2008 ESPEN Sir David Cuthbertson Lecture: Fatty acids and inflammation - from the membrane to the nucleus and from the laboratory bench to the clinic

The 2008 ESPEN Sir David Cuthbertson Lecture: Fatty acids and inflammation - from the membrane to the nucleus and from the laboratory bench to the clinic
The 2008 ESPEN Sir David Cuthbertson Lecture: Fatty acids and inflammation - from the membrane to the nucleus and from the laboratory bench to the clinic
Many chronic conditions involve excessive inflammation that is damaging to host tissues. Excessive or
inappropriate inflammation and immunosuppression are components of the response to surgery,
trauma, injury and infection in some individuals and these can lead, progressively, to sepsis and septic
shock. Hyperinflammation is characterised by the production of inflammatory cytokines, eicosanoids and
other inflammatory mediators, while the immunosuppression is characterised by impairment of antigen
presentation and of certain T cell responses. N-6 fatty acids may contribute to the hyperinflammed and
immunosuppressed states. N-3 fatty acids from fish oil decrease the production of inflammatory cytokines
and eicosanoids. They act both directly (by replacing arachidonic acid as an eicosanoid precursor)
and indirectly (by altering the expression of inflammatory genes through effects on transcription factor
activation). Thus, these fatty acids are potentially useful anti-inflammatory agents and may be of benefit
in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases or at risk of hyperinflammation and sepsis. An emerging
application of n-3 fatty acids is in surgical or critically ill patients where they may be added to parenteral
or enteral formulas. Studies to date are suggestive of clinical benefits from these approaches, although
more robust data are needed especially in critically ill patients.
fish oil, fatty acid, cytokine, inflammation, immune function, eicosanoid, parenteral nutrition, surgery, sepsis
0261-5614
5-12
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Calder, Philip C. (2010) The 2008 ESPEN Sir David Cuthbertson Lecture: Fatty acids and inflammation - from the membrane to the nucleus and from the laboratory bench to the clinic. Clinical Nutrition, 29 (1), 5-12. (doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2009.11.003). (PMID:19931231)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Many chronic conditions involve excessive inflammation that is damaging to host tissues. Excessive or
inappropriate inflammation and immunosuppression are components of the response to surgery,
trauma, injury and infection in some individuals and these can lead, progressively, to sepsis and septic
shock. Hyperinflammation is characterised by the production of inflammatory cytokines, eicosanoids and
other inflammatory mediators, while the immunosuppression is characterised by impairment of antigen
presentation and of certain T cell responses. N-6 fatty acids may contribute to the hyperinflammed and
immunosuppressed states. N-3 fatty acids from fish oil decrease the production of inflammatory cytokines
and eicosanoids. They act both directly (by replacing arachidonic acid as an eicosanoid precursor)
and indirectly (by altering the expression of inflammatory genes through effects on transcription factor
activation). Thus, these fatty acids are potentially useful anti-inflammatory agents and may be of benefit
in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases or at risk of hyperinflammation and sepsis. An emerging
application of n-3 fatty acids is in surgical or critically ill patients where they may be added to parenteral
or enteral formulas. Studies to date are suggestive of clinical benefits from these approaches, although
more robust data are needed especially in critically ill patients.

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Published date: February 2010
Keywords: fish oil, fatty acid, cytokine, inflammation, immune function, eicosanoid, parenteral nutrition, surgery, sepsis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 188711
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/188711
ISSN: 0261-5614
PURE UUID: 02fbae0b-1bb3-448e-a910-7d745a17dda0

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Date deposited: 27 May 2011 09:21
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:32

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