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Mechanisms of glial regeneration in an insect central nervous system

Mechanisms of glial regeneration in an insect central nervous system
Mechanisms of glial regeneration in an insect central nervous system
As in other repairing systems, glial regeneration in insect central nervous connectives, following selective chemical lesioning, involves both exogenous and endogenous elements. Our current evidence, including that obtained with monoclonal antibodies, indicates that the reactive, granule-containing cells are derived from a sub-population of circulating haemocytes which, within 24 h, invade, and are restricted to, the lesion zone. The granule-containing cells are involved in the initial repair of the perineurial region. They also contribute to the first stage in the restoration of the blood-brain barrier and are responsible for recruiting reactive endogenous glia, apparently from the vicinity of the anterior abdominal ganglion. The granule-containing cells transform into or are replaced by functional glia between 3 and 5 days after selective glial disruption, coincident with the appearance in the lesion zone of dividing reactive cells.
0022-0949
59-78
Smith, P.J.
003de469-9420-4f12-8f0e-8e8d76d28d6c
Howes, E.A.
373174b7-4c56-4feb-84da-6b2779ab5fbe
Treherne, J.E.
585f48d3-4b89-4132-81ce-08f2b1770238
Smith, P.J.
003de469-9420-4f12-8f0e-8e8d76d28d6c
Howes, E.A.
373174b7-4c56-4feb-84da-6b2779ab5fbe
Treherne, J.E.
585f48d3-4b89-4132-81ce-08f2b1770238

Smith, P.J., Howes, E.A. and Treherne, J.E. (1987) Mechanisms of glial regeneration in an insect central nervous system. Journal of Experimental Biology, 132, 59-78. (PMID:3323407)

Record type: Article

Abstract

As in other repairing systems, glial regeneration in insect central nervous connectives, following selective chemical lesioning, involves both exogenous and endogenous elements. Our current evidence, including that obtained with monoclonal antibodies, indicates that the reactive, granule-containing cells are derived from a sub-population of circulating haemocytes which, within 24 h, invade, and are restricted to, the lesion zone. The granule-containing cells are involved in the initial repair of the perineurial region. They also contribute to the first stage in the restoration of the blood-brain barrier and are responsible for recruiting reactive endogenous glia, apparently from the vicinity of the anterior abdominal ganglion. The granule-containing cells transform into or are replaced by functional glia between 3 and 5 days after selective glial disruption, coincident with the appearance in the lesion zone of dividing reactive cells.

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Published date: September 1987

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 190299
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/190299
ISSN: 0022-0949
PURE UUID: 71039371-bca2-43de-b183-aa4a7082e8f0
ORCID for P.J. Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4400-6853

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Date deposited: 16 Jun 2011 15:19
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:31

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Contributors

Author: P.J. Smith ORCID iD
Author: E.A. Howes
Author: J.E. Treherne

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