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Long-term growth in vitro of isolated, fully differentiated neurones from the central nervous system of an adult insect

Long-term growth in vitro of isolated, fully differentiated neurones from the central nervous system of an adult insect
Long-term growth in vitro of isolated, fully differentiated neurones from the central nervous system of an adult insect
A method is described for the isolation and growth in vitro of fully differentiated neurones from the thoracic ganglia of adult cockroaches. The presence of insect blood in the culture system is shown to promote growth. The morphology of the growing neurones and the plasticity of the branching processes are described and growth rates are measured. Using a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye, changes of intracellular calcium levels in the growing neurones in response to K+ depolarization have been measured. The results, indicating the presence of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels on neuronal processes in vitro, show that neurones can be maintained in a functional state for several weeks by this technique. Such preparations could prove useful for studying a variety of physiological and pharmacological properties of neurones, including the mechanisms controlling growth, synapse formation and neuronal interactions with other cell types.

0022-0949
591-606
Howes, E.A.
373174b7-4c56-4feb-84da-6b2779ab5fbe
Cheek, T.R.
54540b05-1922-46ec-923a-0df618eccb39
Smith, P.J.S.
003de469-9420-4f12-8f0e-8e8d76d28d6c
Howes, E.A.
373174b7-4c56-4feb-84da-6b2779ab5fbe
Cheek, T.R.
54540b05-1922-46ec-923a-0df618eccb39
Smith, P.J.S.
003de469-9420-4f12-8f0e-8e8d76d28d6c

Howes, E.A., Cheek, T.R. and Smith, P.J.S. (1991) Long-term growth in vitro of isolated, fully differentiated neurones from the central nervous system of an adult insect. Journal of Experimental Biology, 156 (1), 591-606. (PMID:2051137)

Record type: Article

Abstract

A method is described for the isolation and growth in vitro of fully differentiated neurones from the thoracic ganglia of adult cockroaches. The presence of insect blood in the culture system is shown to promote growth. The morphology of the growing neurones and the plasticity of the branching processes are described and growth rates are measured. Using a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye, changes of intracellular calcium levels in the growing neurones in response to K+ depolarization have been measured. The results, indicating the presence of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels on neuronal processes in vitro, show that neurones can be maintained in a functional state for several weeks by this technique. Such preparations could prove useful for studying a variety of physiological and pharmacological properties of neurones, including the mechanisms controlling growth, synapse formation and neuronal interactions with other cell types.

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Published date: March 1991

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 190607
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/190607
ISSN: 0022-0949
PURE UUID: c6036c3c-2a3a-424a-b9e2-729e810532fb
ORCID for P.J.S. Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4400-6853

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jun 2011 08:31
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 03:04

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Contributors

Author: E.A. Howes
Author: T.R. Cheek
Author: P.J.S. Smith ORCID iD

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