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The Age of Information: The Past Development and Future Significance of Computing and Communication

The Age of Information: The Past Development and Future Significance of Computing and Communication
The Age of Information: The Past Development and Future Significance of Computing and Communication
We are now entering a completely new age - The Age of Information. Just as the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions produced enormous changes, information technology is completely altering our lives. Indeed, some patterns have already started to emerge. 'The Age of Information' provides a unique account of the chronological development of computer communications, tracing the origins of the present information technology revolution and explaining the technological features that underlie its tremendous impact. Saxby first asks what this information is that can now be stored, processed, transmitted and accessed electronically. He then takes us through earlier centuries, looking at the prevailing information - ideas, theories, concepts - from Galileo to the present day of Stephen Hawking. The book then explains how the technology works, how it fits together, how the industry is structured and what the prospects are for future exploitation. It considers the impact of the convergence of computer telecommunication technologies, and the significance of rapid technological advance when combined with an equally dramatic decline in costs. The book is for those who are intimidated by the technology and who feel that they are on the outside looking in as well as for IT users who wish to stand back and reflect upon how and why IT has entrenched itself so deeply in our lives.
0333548329
Macmillan Press, New York University Press
Saxby, Stephen
c8e98809-84e7-46c2-a775-27c98444c5f0
Saxby, Stephen
c8e98809-84e7-46c2-a775-27c98444c5f0

Saxby, Stephen (1990) The Age of Information: The Past Development and Future Significance of Computing and Communication , New York, US. Macmillan Press, New York University Press, 322pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

We are now entering a completely new age - The Age of Information. Just as the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions produced enormous changes, information technology is completely altering our lives. Indeed, some patterns have already started to emerge. 'The Age of Information' provides a unique account of the chronological development of computer communications, tracing the origins of the present information technology revolution and explaining the technological features that underlie its tremendous impact. Saxby first asks what this information is that can now be stored, processed, transmitted and accessed electronically. He then takes us through earlier centuries, looking at the prevailing information - ideas, theories, concepts - from Galileo to the present day of Stephen Hawking. The book then explains how the technology works, how it fits together, how the industry is structured and what the prospects are for future exploitation. It considers the impact of the convergence of computer telecommunication technologies, and the significance of rapid technological advance when combined with an equally dramatic decline in costs. The book is for those who are intimidated by the technology and who feel that they are on the outside looking in as well as for IT users who wish to stand back and reflect upon how and why IT has entrenched itself so deeply in our lives.

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More information

Published date: 29 November 1990

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 190755
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/190755
ISBN: 0333548329
PURE UUID: f5302cc0-fe6b-4413-b01a-97985cd5adee

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Date deposited: 21 Jun 2011 13:20
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:36

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