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Can sea surface height be used to estimate oceanic transport variability?

Can sea surface height be used to estimate oceanic transport variability?
Can sea surface height be used to estimate oceanic transport variability?
The relation between the sea surface height and the meridional transport across a zonal section at 26.5°N in the North Atlantic is studied by using an eddy resolving ocean state estimate simulated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. It is shown that the correlation between the zonal sea surface height difference and transport can be substantially increased if the steric height contribution from the seasonal thermocline is removed. The latter explains a substantial part of sea surface height variability, but its effect on transport is weak. It is also found that the zonal steric height difference correlates well with the transport after the contribution of the seasonal thermocline has been removed. There is a similar agreement (with correlation coefficient of 0.63 for the full signal and 0.89 for the mean seasonal cycle) between the meridional transport and steric height based on observations from the Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) project.
0094-8276
L11601
Ivchenko, V.O.
beb6b3f0-541e-4327-866d-17944023bd8c
Sidorenko, D.
12113504-e503-4fab-8c33-3cf33f765681
Danilov, S.
c210fd04-733e-4452-bd79-96879e546c0b
Losch, M.
efb009b3-8604-4aee-bd46-38b7a3e1bcbe
Schröter, J.
b2ce1f0a-a173-4483-9541-c831e917e19e
Ivchenko, V.O.
beb6b3f0-541e-4327-866d-17944023bd8c
Sidorenko, D.
12113504-e503-4fab-8c33-3cf33f765681
Danilov, S.
c210fd04-733e-4452-bd79-96879e546c0b
Losch, M.
efb009b3-8604-4aee-bd46-38b7a3e1bcbe
Schröter, J.
b2ce1f0a-a173-4483-9541-c831e917e19e

Ivchenko, V.O., Sidorenko, D., Danilov, S., Losch, M. and Schröter, J. (2011) Can sea surface height be used to estimate oceanic transport variability? Geophysical Research Letters, 38 (11), L11601. (doi:10.1029/2011GL047387).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The relation between the sea surface height and the meridional transport across a zonal section at 26.5°N in the North Atlantic is studied by using an eddy resolving ocean state estimate simulated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. It is shown that the correlation between the zonal sea surface height difference and transport can be substantially increased if the steric height contribution from the seasonal thermocline is removed. The latter explains a substantial part of sea surface height variability, but its effect on transport is weak. It is also found that the zonal steric height difference correlates well with the transport after the contribution of the seasonal thermocline has been removed. There is a similar agreement (with correlation coefficient of 0.63 for the full signal and 0.89 for the mean seasonal cycle) between the meridional transport and steric height based on observations from the Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) project.

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Published date: 2011
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 191511
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/191511
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: 9479b480-0746-4bb4-924c-d638a925916e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jun 2011 15:28
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:27

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