The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

"It's like there are two people in my head": a phenomenological exploration of anorexia nervosa and its relationship to the self

"It's like there are two people in my head": a phenomenological exploration of anorexia nervosa and its relationship to the self
"It's like there are two people in my head": a phenomenological exploration of anorexia nervosa and its relationship to the self
This study explores the lived experience of anorexia nervosa from the perspective of those who use pro-recovery websites for eating disorders. Fourteen people participated in an online focus group or an e-interview. Data was analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Participants described their disorder as a functional tool for avoiding and coping with negative emotions, changing their identity and obtaining control. A central theme was the experience of an ‘anorexic voice’ with both demonic and friendly qualities. This voice felt like an external entity that criticised individuals and sometimes dominated their sense of self, particularly as anorexia nervosa got worse. Applying dialogical theory suggests a new model of anorexia nervosa, where the anorexic voice is a self-critical position, which disagrees with and attempts to dominate the more rational self. It is suggested that to move on from anorexia nervosa the individual needs to address their anorexic voice and develop a new dominant position that accepts and values their sense of self
Williams, Sarah
f98f47db-b1d6-42c2-b0eb-7c0cb9a981d0
Reid, Marie
9c3c9f80-277f-43b8-ac8c-29f9c527e196
Williams, Sarah
f98f47db-b1d6-42c2-b0eb-7c0cb9a981d0
Reid, Marie
9c3c9f80-277f-43b8-ac8c-29f9c527e196

Williams, Sarah and Reid, Marie (2011) "It's like there are two people in my head": a phenomenological exploration of anorexia nervosa and its relationship to the self. Psychology and Health.

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study explores the lived experience of anorexia nervosa from the perspective of those who use pro-recovery websites for eating disorders. Fourteen people participated in an online focus group or an e-interview. Data was analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Participants described their disorder as a functional tool for avoiding and coping with negative emotions, changing their identity and obtaining control. A central theme was the experience of an ‘anorexic voice’ with both demonic and friendly qualities. This voice felt like an external entity that criticised individuals and sometimes dominated their sense of self, particularly as anorexia nervosa got worse. Applying dialogical theory suggests a new model of anorexia nervosa, where the anorexic voice is a self-critical position, which disagrees with and attempts to dominate the more rational self. It is suggested that to move on from anorexia nervosa the individual needs to address their anorexic voice and develop a new dominant position that accepts and values their sense of self

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 191817
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/191817
PURE UUID: 14d88ac0-06f5-4fcb-a585-4c78a0bb13c1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jun 2011 07:34
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:34

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×