The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Perceptions and practice of concordance in nurses’ prescribing consultations: findings from a national questionnaire survey and case studies of practice in England

Perceptions and practice of concordance in nurses’ prescribing consultations: findings from a national questionnaire survey and case studies of practice in England
Perceptions and practice of concordance in nurses’ prescribing consultations: findings from a national questionnaire survey and case studies of practice in England
Background:
The number of nurses able to independently prescribe medicines in England is increasing. Patient adherence to prescribed medicines remains a significant problem [Department of Health, 2000. Pharmacy in the Future: Implementing the NHS Plan. A Programme for Pharmacy in the NHS. Stationary Office, London]. Concordance—a partnership approach to medicine consultations—is advocated as an effective solution [Medicines Partnership, 2003. Project Evaluation Toolkit. Medicines Partnership, London].

Objectives:
To investigate whether nurses were practising the principles of concordance within their prescribing interactions.

Design:
Phase (i) postal questionnaire survey. Phase (ii): case studies of practice.

Settings:
Phase (i) primary and secondary care trusts throughout England in which nurse prescribers were practicing. Phase (ii) six general practice settings; one community midwifery service; one specialist community palliative care service; one secondary care ophthalmology unit; one NHS walk-in centre.

Participants:
Phase (i) a random sample of 246 nurses registered as independent nurse prescribers with the Nursing and Midwifery Council in 2002/2003. Phase (ii) purposively selected sample of 14 nurse prescribers who participated in Phase (i) of the study; a total of 208 purposively selected patients completed self-administered questionnaires.

Methods:
Phase (i) postal questionnaires. Phase (ii) structured non-participant observation of 118 nurse prescribing consultations; 115 post-consultation patient questionnaires; 93-patient postal questionnaires.

Results:
99% of the nurses in the national survey stated they were practising the principles of concordance. The majority of patients surveyed also reported experiencing concordance in practice. Observation of practice revealed that although some principles of concordance were regularly integrated into nurses’ practice, other principles were less often in evidence. Some evidence from both observation of practice and patient questionnaires suggested that a professionally determined ‘compliance’ agenda may still be partially operating in practice.

Conclusions:
Most nurses believe they are practicing concordance in their prescribing consultations. The majority of patients also reported that they had experienced some of the principles of concordance in practice. Observation of practice highlighted that the shift from a professionally determined compliance agenda to the integration of concordance into nurses’ prescribing consultations had not yet taken place.
concordance, medicines management, nurse prescribing
0020-7489
9-18
Latter, S.
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Maben, J.
482f92f0-6339-42dd-9ee5-3fbc08d1e6f0
Myall, M.
0604ba0f-75c2-4783-9afe-aa54bf81513f
Young, A.
6bb7aa9c-776b-4bdd-be4e-cf67abd05652
Latter, S.
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Maben, J.
482f92f0-6339-42dd-9ee5-3fbc08d1e6f0
Myall, M.
0604ba0f-75c2-4783-9afe-aa54bf81513f
Young, A.
6bb7aa9c-776b-4bdd-be4e-cf67abd05652

Latter, S., Maben, J., Myall, M. and Young, A. (2007) Perceptions and practice of concordance in nurses’ prescribing consultations: findings from a national questionnaire survey and case studies of practice in England. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 44 (1), 9-18. (doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2005.11.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background:
The number of nurses able to independently prescribe medicines in England is increasing. Patient adherence to prescribed medicines remains a significant problem [Department of Health, 2000. Pharmacy in the Future: Implementing the NHS Plan. A Programme for Pharmacy in the NHS. Stationary Office, London]. Concordance—a partnership approach to medicine consultations—is advocated as an effective solution [Medicines Partnership, 2003. Project Evaluation Toolkit. Medicines Partnership, London].

Objectives:
To investigate whether nurses were practising the principles of concordance within their prescribing interactions.

Design:
Phase (i) postal questionnaire survey. Phase (ii): case studies of practice.

Settings:
Phase (i) primary and secondary care trusts throughout England in which nurse prescribers were practicing. Phase (ii) six general practice settings; one community midwifery service; one specialist community palliative care service; one secondary care ophthalmology unit; one NHS walk-in centre.

Participants:
Phase (i) a random sample of 246 nurses registered as independent nurse prescribers with the Nursing and Midwifery Council in 2002/2003. Phase (ii) purposively selected sample of 14 nurse prescribers who participated in Phase (i) of the study; a total of 208 purposively selected patients completed self-administered questionnaires.

Methods:
Phase (i) postal questionnaires. Phase (ii) structured non-participant observation of 118 nurse prescribing consultations; 115 post-consultation patient questionnaires; 93-patient postal questionnaires.

Results:
99% of the nurses in the national survey stated they were practising the principles of concordance. The majority of patients surveyed also reported experiencing concordance in practice. Observation of practice revealed that although some principles of concordance were regularly integrated into nurses’ practice, other principles were less often in evidence. Some evidence from both observation of practice and patient questionnaires suggested that a professionally determined ‘compliance’ agenda may still be partially operating in practice.

Conclusions:
Most nurses believe they are practicing concordance in their prescribing consultations. The majority of patients also reported that they had experienced some of the principles of concordance in practice. Observation of practice highlighted that the shift from a professionally determined compliance agenda to the integration of concordance into nurses’ prescribing consultations had not yet taken place.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: January 2007
Keywords: concordance, medicines management, nurse prescribing
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 19252
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/19252
ISSN: 0020-7489
PURE UUID: b915775a-6487-4d74-89e2-849a0a6919a0
ORCID for S. Latter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0973-0512
ORCID for M. Myall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8733-7412
ORCID for A. Young: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1486-5561

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Feb 2006
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:52

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×