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Intact printing of solid phase materials using femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer technique

Intact printing of solid phase materials using femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer technique
Intact printing of solid phase materials using femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer technique
Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is an important direct-write technique for printing of materials and devices with micron and sub-micron resolution [1, 2]. In the conventional LIFT technique the material to be printed (the donor) is coated onto a laser-transparent substrate (the carrier). A laser pulse is then focussed at the carrier-donor interface which melts or ablates the donor and transfers it onto a nearby placed substrate (the receiver) as shown in Fig. 1. The inherent disadvantage of the conventional LIFT technique is that the donor acts as its own propellant and hence gets damaged during the transfer. Many complementary LIFT techniques have been developed in recent years to avoid this damage and to achieve an intact transfer of donors in the solid phase such as Dynamic Release Layer (DRL)-LIFT [3], Ballistic Laser-Assisted Solid Transfer (BLAST) [4] and Laser Induced Thermal Imaging (LITI) [5]. A brief overview of these techniques, the successes achieved by them to date, their current challenges and the ongoing work in this field will be presented.
Kaur, K.S.
aedd9bea-c39d-41c8-9ae3-845cda3b4ff7
Banks, D.P.
134b4e3e-9c17-4155-a3e6-bd16d5f94be4
Grivas, C.
7f564818-0ac0-4127-82a7-22e87ac35f1a
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Kaur, K.S.
aedd9bea-c39d-41c8-9ae3-845cda3b4ff7
Banks, D.P.
134b4e3e-9c17-4155-a3e6-bd16d5f94be4
Grivas, C.
7f564818-0ac0-4127-82a7-22e87ac35f1a
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020

Kaur, K.S., Banks, D.P., Grivas, C. and Eason, R.W. (2009) Intact printing of solid phase materials using femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer technique. IONS-5 meeting in ICFO, Spain. 19 - 20 Feb 2009. 1 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is an important direct-write technique for printing of materials and devices with micron and sub-micron resolution [1, 2]. In the conventional LIFT technique the material to be printed (the donor) is coated onto a laser-transparent substrate (the carrier). A laser pulse is then focussed at the carrier-donor interface which melts or ablates the donor and transfers it onto a nearby placed substrate (the receiver) as shown in Fig. 1. The inherent disadvantage of the conventional LIFT technique is that the donor acts as its own propellant and hence gets damaged during the transfer. Many complementary LIFT techniques have been developed in recent years to avoid this damage and to achieve an intact transfer of donors in the solid phase such as Dynamic Release Layer (DRL)-LIFT [3], Ballistic Laser-Assisted Solid Transfer (BLAST) [4] and Laser Induced Thermal Imaging (LITI) [5]. A brief overview of these techniques, the successes achieved by them to date, their current challenges and the ongoing work in this field will be presented.

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Published date: 19 February 2009
Venue - Dates: IONS-5 meeting in ICFO, Spain, 2009-02-19 - 2009-02-20

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 192639
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/192639
PURE UUID: 0c52c3c0-2a61-4fdb-b735-a811e38e16a6
ORCID for R.W. Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

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Date deposited: 07 Jul 2011 08:34
Last modified: 24 Mar 2020 01:24

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