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Impulsivity and emotion dysregulation in borderline personality disorder

Impulsivity and emotion dysregulation in borderline personality disorder
Impulsivity and emotion dysregulation in borderline personality disorder
This study examined the association of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and negative emotional states with impulsivity in the laboratory. Undergraduate participants who were high in BPD features (high-BPD; n = 39) and controls who were low in BPD features (low-BPD; n = 56) completed measures of negative emotional state before a laboratory measure of impulsivity—a passive avoidance learning task. Controlling for psychopathology, high-BPD participants committed a greater number of impulsive responses than did low-BPD participants. Negative emotional state moderated the effect of BPD on impulsive responses. High-BPD participants who were in a negative emotional state committed fewer impulsive responses than high-BPD participants who were low in negative emotional state. Fear, nervousness, and shame negatively correlated with impulsivity among high-BPD participants but not among low-BPD participants. In addition, high-BPD participants reported greater emotion dysregulation in a variety of domains, compared with low-BPD participants
0885-579X
148-164
Chapman, Alexander L.
e40a7f1e-ae38-4568-85e4-f03d8b756162
Leung, Debbie W.
a55684b7-a892-4309-91a1-55ef9f1951ba
Lynch, Thomas R.
29e90123-0aef-46c8-b320-1617fb48bb20
Chapman, Alexander L.
e40a7f1e-ae38-4568-85e4-f03d8b756162
Leung, Debbie W.
a55684b7-a892-4309-91a1-55ef9f1951ba
Lynch, Thomas R.
29e90123-0aef-46c8-b320-1617fb48bb20

Chapman, Alexander L., Leung, Debbie W. and Lynch, Thomas R. (2008) Impulsivity and emotion dysregulation in borderline personality disorder. Journal of Personality Disorders, 22 (2), 148-164. (doi:10.1521/pedi.2008.22.2.148). (PMID:18419235)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study examined the association of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and negative emotional states with impulsivity in the laboratory. Undergraduate participants who were high in BPD features (high-BPD; n = 39) and controls who were low in BPD features (low-BPD; n = 56) completed measures of negative emotional state before a laboratory measure of impulsivity—a passive avoidance learning task. Controlling for psychopathology, high-BPD participants committed a greater number of impulsive responses than did low-BPD participants. Negative emotional state moderated the effect of BPD on impulsive responses. High-BPD participants who were in a negative emotional state committed fewer impulsive responses than high-BPD participants who were low in negative emotional state. Fear, nervousness, and shame negatively correlated with impulsivity among high-BPD participants but not among low-BPD participants. In addition, high-BPD participants reported greater emotion dysregulation in a variety of domains, compared with low-BPD participants

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Published date: April 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 193961
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/193961
ISSN: 0885-579X
PURE UUID: 0d8533ac-2089-4845-b88e-f2a7f79859fe
ORCID for Thomas R. Lynch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1270-6097

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Date deposited: 22 Jul 2011 08:52
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 01:44

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Contributors

Author: Alexander L. Chapman
Author: Debbie W. Leung
Author: Thomas R. Lynch ORCID iD

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