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Eye movement sequences during simple versus complex information processing of scenes in autism spectrum disorder

Eye movement sequences during simple versus complex information processing of scenes in autism spectrum disorder
Eye movement sequences during simple versus complex information processing of scenes in autism spectrum disorder
Minshew and Goldstein (1998) postulated that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disorder of complex information processing. The current study was designed to investigate this hypothesis. Participants with and without ASD completed two scene perception tasks: a simple “spot the difference” task, where they had to say which one of a pair of pictures had a detail missing, and a complex “which one's weird” task, where they had to decide which one of a pair of pictures looks “weird”. Participants with ASD did not differ from TD participants in their ability to accurately identify the target picture in both tasks. However, analysis of the eye movement sequences showed that participants with ASD viewed scenes differently from normal controls exclusively for the complex task. This difference in eye movement patterns, and the method used to examine different patterns, adds to the knowledge base regarding eye movements and ASD. Our results are in accordance with Minshew and Goldstein's theory that complex, but not simple, information processing is impaired in ASD.

2090-1925
657383
Au-Yeung, Sheena K.
a37bcecc-10a4-4ecb-a5d6-b50ef15b272c
Benson, Valerie
4827cede-6668-4e3d-bded-ade4cd5e5db5
Castelhano, Monica
feb47549-199e-4c71-affb-ff47f9bbdb3a
Rayner, Keith
15f4ff90-d631-457b-a055-3944b702ea27
Au-Yeung, Sheena K.
a37bcecc-10a4-4ecb-a5d6-b50ef15b272c
Benson, Valerie
4827cede-6668-4e3d-bded-ade4cd5e5db5
Castelhano, Monica
feb47549-199e-4c71-affb-ff47f9bbdb3a
Rayner, Keith
15f4ff90-d631-457b-a055-3944b702ea27

Au-Yeung, Sheena K., Benson, Valerie, Castelhano, Monica and Rayner, Keith (2011) Eye movement sequences during simple versus complex information processing of scenes in autism spectrum disorder. Autism Research and Treatment, 2011, 657383. (doi:10.1155/2011/657383).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Minshew and Goldstein (1998) postulated that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disorder of complex information processing. The current study was designed to investigate this hypothesis. Participants with and without ASD completed two scene perception tasks: a simple “spot the difference” task, where they had to say which one of a pair of pictures had a detail missing, and a complex “which one's weird” task, where they had to decide which one of a pair of pictures looks “weird”. Participants with ASD did not differ from TD participants in their ability to accurately identify the target picture in both tasks. However, analysis of the eye movement sequences showed that participants with ASD viewed scenes differently from normal controls exclusively for the complex task. This difference in eye movement patterns, and the method used to examine different patterns, adds to the knowledge base regarding eye movements and ASD. Our results are in accordance with Minshew and Goldstein's theory that complex, but not simple, information processing is impaired in ASD.

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Published date: 20 June 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 194001
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/194001
ISSN: 2090-1925
PURE UUID: 4e7785f9-f928-47fb-bd59-19082f749c96

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Date deposited: 22 Jul 2011 10:56
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:28

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