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Anion recognition and sensing: the state of the art and future perspectives

Anion recognition and sensing: the state of the art and future perspectives
Anion recognition and sensing: the state of the art and future perspectives
Anion recognition chemistry has grown from its beginnings in the late 1960s with positively charged ammonium cryptand receptors for halide binding to, at the end of the millennium, a plethora of charged and neutral, cyclic and acyclic, inorganic and organic supramolecular host systems for the selective complexation, detection, and separation of anionic guest species. Solvation effects and pH values have been shown to play crucial roles in the overall anion recognition process. More recent developments include exciting advances in anion-templated syntheses and directed self-assembly, ion-pair recognition, and the function of anions in supramolecular catalysis.
anions, macrocycles, molecular recognition, self-assembly, sensors, supramolecular chemistry, ruthenium(ii) bipyridyl receptor, selective electrochemicalrecognition, ditopic polyammonium macrocycles, neutral ferrocenoylreceptors, phosphine oxide disulfoxide, quaternary ammonium-salts, field-effect transistors, lewis acidic hosts, synthetic receptor
1433-7851
486-516
Beer, Paul D.
6af15407-244d-4e11-8147-a62a04672f4e
Gale, Philip A.
c840b7e9-6847-4843-91af-fa0f8563d943
Beer, Paul D.
6af15407-244d-4e11-8147-a62a04672f4e
Gale, Philip A.
c840b7e9-6847-4843-91af-fa0f8563d943

Beer, Paul D. and Gale, Philip A. (2001) Anion recognition and sensing: the state of the art and future perspectives. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 40 (3), 486-516. (doi:10.1002/1521-3773(20010202)40:3<486::AID-ANIE486>3.0.CO;2-P).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Anion recognition chemistry has grown from its beginnings in the late 1960s with positively charged ammonium cryptand receptors for halide binding to, at the end of the millennium, a plethora of charged and neutral, cyclic and acyclic, inorganic and organic supramolecular host systems for the selective complexation, detection, and separation of anionic guest species. Solvation effects and pH values have been shown to play crucial roles in the overall anion recognition process. More recent developments include exciting advances in anion-templated syntheses and directed self-assembly, ion-pair recognition, and the function of anions in supramolecular catalysis.

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More information

Published date: 2001
Keywords: anions, macrocycles, molecular recognition, self-assembly, sensors, supramolecular chemistry, ruthenium(ii) bipyridyl receptor, selective electrochemicalrecognition, ditopic polyammonium macrocycles, neutral ferrocenoylreceptors, phosphine oxide disulfoxide, quaternary ammonium-salts, field-effect transistors, lewis acidic hosts, synthetic receptor

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 19402
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/19402
ISSN: 1433-7851
PURE UUID: a4e45041-ddfe-4378-961e-aba44e690936
ORCID for Philip A. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9751-4910

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Feb 2006
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:52

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