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Thought suppression and treatment outcome in late-life depression

Thought suppression and treatment outcome in late-life depression
Thought suppression and treatment outcome in late-life depression
This study examined severity of depression, age of onset, and thought suppression as predictors of treatment outcome. Measures were taken pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at six-month follow-up in 34 depressed older adults receiving the treatment protocol described in Lynch, Morse, Mendelson & Robins (Dialectical behavior therapy for depressed older adults, American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 11, 33–45, 2003). Severity and chronicity of depression and higher levels of thought suppression were associated with higher depressive symptoms six months after treatment. Findings are consistent with research suggesting that severity and chronicity of depression predict poor clinical outcome. In addition, these results provide preliminary evidence that the tendency to cope with unwanted thoughts by deliberate attempts to not experience such thoughts may be an important pre-treatment predictor of outcome among depressed older adults. Larger studies are needed to explore whether thought suppression mediates long-term recovery from depression.
1360-7863
35-39
Rosenthal, M.Z.
776b9d0c-e084-4251-9026-1094015380be
Cheavens, J.S.
47faaac4-2363-4cf9-af60-8b78e3a22b70
Compton, J.S.
0a366a20-0fb6-4e6b-bfc7-000467fc06ff
Thorp, R.S.
d3773d64-c4ca-4a35-929b-837c08295fe0
Lynch, T.R.
29e90123-0aef-46c8-b320-1617fb48bb20
Rosenthal, M.Z.
776b9d0c-e084-4251-9026-1094015380be
Cheavens, J.S.
47faaac4-2363-4cf9-af60-8b78e3a22b70
Compton, J.S.
0a366a20-0fb6-4e6b-bfc7-000467fc06ff
Thorp, R.S.
d3773d64-c4ca-4a35-929b-837c08295fe0
Lynch, T.R.
29e90123-0aef-46c8-b320-1617fb48bb20

Rosenthal, M.Z., Cheavens, J.S., Compton, J.S., Thorp, R.S. and Lynch, T.R. (2005) Thought suppression and treatment outcome in late-life depression. Aging & Mental Health, 9 (1), 35-39. (doi:10.1080/13607860512331334040). (PMID:15841830)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study examined severity of depression, age of onset, and thought suppression as predictors of treatment outcome. Measures were taken pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at six-month follow-up in 34 depressed older adults receiving the treatment protocol described in Lynch, Morse, Mendelson & Robins (Dialectical behavior therapy for depressed older adults, American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 11, 33–45, 2003). Severity and chronicity of depression and higher levels of thought suppression were associated with higher depressive symptoms six months after treatment. Findings are consistent with research suggesting that severity and chronicity of depression predict poor clinical outcome. In addition, these results provide preliminary evidence that the tendency to cope with unwanted thoughts by deliberate attempts to not experience such thoughts may be an important pre-treatment predictor of outcome among depressed older adults. Larger studies are needed to explore whether thought suppression mediates long-term recovery from depression.

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Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 194221
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/194221
ISSN: 1360-7863
PURE UUID: a8775b63-e83a-4808-9707-faaadf1e2902
ORCID for T.R. Lynch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1270-6097

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Date deposited: 26 Jul 2011 08:44
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:43

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