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The VP3 gene of human group C rotavirus

The VP3 gene of human group C rotavirus
The VP3 gene of human group C rotavirus
The complete nucleotide sequence of genome segment 4 from the human group C rotavirus (Bristol strain) was determined. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the genome termini with the consensus 5' and 3' terminal non-coding sequences of the human group C rotavirus genome revealed characteristic 5' and 3' sequence motifs. Human group C rotavirus genome segment 4 is 2,166bp long and encodes a single open reading frame of 2,082 nucleotides (693 amino acids) starting at nucleotide 55 and terminating at nucleotide 2,136 giving a 3' untranslated region of 30 nucleotides. Alignment with the porcine group C VP3 equivalent gene showed the human gene is one amino acid longer, and that the proteins have 84.1% amino acid sequence identity. A conserved potential nucleotide binding motif shared with the porcine VP3 sequence was identified. Analogy with the group A rotaviruses suggested that the genome segment 4 encodes the group C rotavirus guanylyltransferase.
rotavirus, dsrna, vp3 gene
0920-8569
169-173
Samarbaf-Zadeh, Ali Reza
074c0e1d-9201-4537-814a-56e0511c8ecb
Lambden, Paul R.
4fcd536e-2d9a-4366-97c6-386e6b005698
Green, Steve
969d43bc-7cfb-4149-b6d4-b3cde2fcce38
Deng, Yu
d0f1af1d-6428-4b11-8fcb-ffef9f8c40f8
Caul, E. Owen
177391c9-26e2-4c94-a459-d9353c2daa61
Clarke, Ian N.
ff6c9324-3547-4039-bb2c-10c0b3327a8b
Samarbaf-Zadeh, Ali Reza
074c0e1d-9201-4537-814a-56e0511c8ecb
Lambden, Paul R.
4fcd536e-2d9a-4366-97c6-386e6b005698
Green, Steve
969d43bc-7cfb-4149-b6d4-b3cde2fcce38
Deng, Yu
d0f1af1d-6428-4b11-8fcb-ffef9f8c40f8
Caul, E. Owen
177391c9-26e2-4c94-a459-d9353c2daa61
Clarke, Ian N.
ff6c9324-3547-4039-bb2c-10c0b3327a8b

Samarbaf-Zadeh, Ali Reza, Lambden, Paul R., Green, Steve, Deng, Yu, Caul, E. Owen and Clarke, Ian N. (1996) The VP3 gene of human group C rotavirus. Virus Genes, 13 (2), 169-173. (doi:10.1007/BF00568909). (PMID:8972570)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The complete nucleotide sequence of genome segment 4 from the human group C rotavirus (Bristol strain) was determined. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the genome termini with the consensus 5' and 3' terminal non-coding sequences of the human group C rotavirus genome revealed characteristic 5' and 3' sequence motifs. Human group C rotavirus genome segment 4 is 2,166bp long and encodes a single open reading frame of 2,082 nucleotides (693 amino acids) starting at nucleotide 55 and terminating at nucleotide 2,136 giving a 3' untranslated region of 30 nucleotides. Alignment with the porcine group C VP3 equivalent gene showed the human gene is one amino acid longer, and that the proteins have 84.1% amino acid sequence identity. A conserved potential nucleotide binding motif shared with the porcine VP3 sequence was identified. Analogy with the group A rotaviruses suggested that the genome segment 4 encodes the group C rotavirus guanylyltransferase.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: January 1996
Keywords: rotavirus, dsrna, vp3 gene

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 194303
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/194303
ISSN: 0920-8569
PURE UUID: fba187df-7292-4ab5-bf78-be54656e006a
ORCID for Ian N. Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4938-1620

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jul 2011 08:52
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:29

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