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Parafoveal-on-foveal effects on eye movements during reading

Parafoveal-on-foveal effects on eye movements during reading
Parafoveal-on-foveal effects on eye movements during reading
Parafoveal-on-foveal effects refer to the possibility that processing of the parafoveal word can influence the fixation durations on the foveal word during reading. In this Chapter, I will review the literature of studies examining this issue. Effects observed in reading-like tasks have been questioned on methodological grounds with regards to the generalisibility to normal reading. The clearest evidence for the existence of parafoveal-on-foveal effects comes from experiments allowing tight control over the stimuli but restricting the observations to fixation locations very close to the parafoveal word, and from corpus studies showing reliable but numerically small effects. I will make the claim that with regards to taking reported parafoveal-on-foveal effects as evidence for parallel lexical processing, the jury is still out. The argument is that as long as parafoveal-on-foveal effects are numerically small and difficult to replicate in a controlled experiment, they can be explained on the basis of mislocated fixations, machine error and binocular disparity. These latter three influences can create apparent parafoveal-on-foveal effects without being linked to parallel lexical processing.
9780199539789
839-855
Oxford University Press
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce
Liversedge, Simon
Gilchrist, Iain
Everling, Stefan
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce
Liversedge, Simon
Gilchrist, Iain
Everling, Stefan

Drieghe, Denis (2011) Parafoveal-on-foveal effects on eye movements during reading. In, Liversedge, Simon, Gilchrist, Iain and Everling, Stefan (eds.) Oxford Handbook on Eye Movements. (Oxford Library of Psychology) Oxford, GB. Oxford University Press, pp. 839-855.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Parafoveal-on-foveal effects refer to the possibility that processing of the parafoveal word can influence the fixation durations on the foveal word during reading. In this Chapter, I will review the literature of studies examining this issue. Effects observed in reading-like tasks have been questioned on methodological grounds with regards to the generalisibility to normal reading. The clearest evidence for the existence of parafoveal-on-foveal effects comes from experiments allowing tight control over the stimuli but restricting the observations to fixation locations very close to the parafoveal word, and from corpus studies showing reliable but numerically small effects. I will make the claim that with regards to taking reported parafoveal-on-foveal effects as evidence for parallel lexical processing, the jury is still out. The argument is that as long as parafoveal-on-foveal effects are numerically small and difficult to replicate in a controlled experiment, they can be explained on the basis of mislocated fixations, machine error and binocular disparity. These latter three influences can create apparent parafoveal-on-foveal effects without being linked to parallel lexical processing.

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Published date: 2011

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Local EPrints ID: 195817
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/195817
ISBN: 9780199539789
PURE UUID: aed7a33d-8bb1-4cfc-96c3-d988f713e8eb

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Date deposited: 30 Aug 2011 09:29
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:24

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Contributors

Author: Denis Drieghe
Editor: Simon Liversedge
Editor: Iain Gilchrist
Editor: Stefan Everling

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