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Modified electrodes for NADH oxidation and dehydrogenase-based biosensors

Modified electrodes for NADH oxidation and dehydrogenase-based biosensors
Modified electrodes for NADH oxidation and dehydrogenase-based biosensors
The direct electrochemical oxidation of beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) at clean electrodes proceeds through a radical cation intermediate at high overpotentials and is subject to rapid fouling. Consequently, there has been a considerable body of work over the last 20 years looking at ways in which to catalyse the reaction using a wide variety of different types of modified electrode. These studies have resulted in a good knowledge of the essential features required for efficient catalysis. In designing modified electrodes for NADH oxidation, it is not only important to identify suitable redox groups, which can catalyse NADH oxidation and can be attached to the electrode surface; it is also important to ensure facile charge transport between the immobilised redox sites in order to ensure that, in multilayer systems, the whole of the redox film contributes to the catalytic oxidation. One way to achieve this is by the use of electronically conducting polymers such as poly(aniline).
nadh oxidation, dehydrogenase, biosensor, charge transport, conducting polymers, chemically modified electrodes, electrocatalytic oxidation, compositefilms, redox polymers, kinetics, mechanism, switch, acid
117-122
Bartlett, P.N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075
Simon, E.
e381314d-f74a-4f11-847d-66404ccada06
Toh, C.S.
faf8cf8c-8408-4d88-9e64-e964a15b3872
Bartlett, P.N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075
Simon, E.
e381314d-f74a-4f11-847d-66404ccada06
Toh, C.S.
faf8cf8c-8408-4d88-9e64-e964a15b3872

Bartlett, P.N., Simon, E. and Toh, C.S. (2002) Modified electrodes for NADH oxidation and dehydrogenase-based biosensors. Bioelectrochemistry, 56 (1-2), 117-122. (doi:10.1016/S1567-5394(02)00047-6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The direct electrochemical oxidation of beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) at clean electrodes proceeds through a radical cation intermediate at high overpotentials and is subject to rapid fouling. Consequently, there has been a considerable body of work over the last 20 years looking at ways in which to catalyse the reaction using a wide variety of different types of modified electrode. These studies have resulted in a good knowledge of the essential features required for efficient catalysis. In designing modified electrodes for NADH oxidation, it is not only important to identify suitable redox groups, which can catalyse NADH oxidation and can be attached to the electrode surface; it is also important to ensure facile charge transport between the immobilised redox sites in order to ensure that, in multilayer systems, the whole of the redox film contributes to the catalytic oxidation. One way to achieve this is by the use of electronically conducting polymers such as poly(aniline).

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More information

Published date: 15 May 2002
Keywords: nadh oxidation, dehydrogenase, biosensor, charge transport, conducting polymers, chemically modified electrodes, electrocatalytic oxidation, compositefilms, redox polymers, kinetics, mechanism, switch, acid

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 19666
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/19666
PURE UUID: 4454f111-601e-42df-a7a3-fafa5abfa1be
ORCID for P.N. Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7300-6900

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Feb 2006
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 02:04

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