Self-enhancement and self-protection strategies in China: cultural expressions of a fundamental human motive


Hepper, Erica G., Sedikides, Constantine and Cai, Huajian (2011) Self-enhancement and self-protection strategies in China: cultural expressions of a fundamental human motive Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

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Description/Abstract

The motive to enhance and protect positive views of the self manifests in a variety of cognitive and behavioral strategies but its universality versus cultural specificity is debated by scholars. We sought to inform this debate by soliciting self-reports of the four principal types of self-enhancement and self-protection strategy (positivity embracement, favorable construals, self-affirming reflections, defensiveness) from a Chinese sample and comparing their structure, levels, and correlates to a Western sample. The Chinese data fit the same factor structure, and were subject to the same individual differences in regulatory focus, self-esteem, and narcissism, as the Western data. Chinese participants reported lower levels of (enhancement-oriented) positivity embracement but higher levels of (protection-oriented) defensiveness than Western participants. Levels of favorable construals were also higher in the Chinese sample, with no differences in self-affirming reflections. These findings support and extend the universalist perspective on the self by demonstrating the cross-cultural structure, yet culturally sensitive manifestation, of self-enhancement motivation

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Currently in 'OnlineFirst' section of journal
ISSNs: 0022-0221 (print)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
ePrint ID: 198575
Date :
Date Event
3 October 2011Accepted/In Press
16 December 2011Published
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2011 10:06
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2017 01:30
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/198575

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