The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A micromachined calorimetric gas sensor: an application of electrodeposited nanostructured palladium for the detection of combustible gases

A micromachined calorimetric gas sensor: an application of electrodeposited nanostructured palladium for the detection of combustible gases
A micromachined calorimetric gas sensor: an application of electrodeposited nanostructured palladium for the detection of combustible gases
Palladium films with regular nanoarchitectures were electrochemically deposited from the hexagonal (H1) lyotropic liquid crystalline phase of the nonionic surfactant octaethyleneglycol monohexadecyl ether (C16EO8) onto micromachined silicon hotplate structures. The H1-e Pd films were shown to have high surface areas (~28 m2 g-1) and to act as effective and stable catalysts for the detection of methane in air on heating to 500 °C. The response of the H1-e Pd-coated planar pellistors was found to be linearly proportional to the concentration of methane between 0 and 2.5% in air with a detection limit below 0.125%. Our results show that the electrochemical deposition of nanostructured metal films offers a promising approach to the fabrication of micromachined calorimetric gas sensors for combustible gases.
si-planar-pellistor, catalytic-oxidation, supported palladium, methane oxidation, high-sensitivity, metal-catalysts, platinum films, alumina, state, chemistry
0003-2700
126-132
Bartlett, Philip N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075
Guerin, Samuel
e185e0c2-85c6-4d1c-a2cf-cd2f410d346f
Bartlett, Philip N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075
Guerin, Samuel
e185e0c2-85c6-4d1c-a2cf-cd2f410d346f

Bartlett, Philip N. and Guerin, Samuel (2003) A micromachined calorimetric gas sensor: an application of electrodeposited nanostructured palladium for the detection of combustible gases. Analytical Chemistry, 75 (1), 126-132. (doi:10.1021/ac026141w).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Palladium films with regular nanoarchitectures were electrochemically deposited from the hexagonal (H1) lyotropic liquid crystalline phase of the nonionic surfactant octaethyleneglycol monohexadecyl ether (C16EO8) onto micromachined silicon hotplate structures. The H1-e Pd films were shown to have high surface areas (~28 m2 g-1) and to act as effective and stable catalysts for the detection of methane in air on heating to 500 °C. The response of the H1-e Pd-coated planar pellistors was found to be linearly proportional to the concentration of methane between 0 and 2.5% in air with a detection limit below 0.125%. Our results show that the electrochemical deposition of nanostructured metal films offers a promising approach to the fabrication of micromachined calorimetric gas sensors for combustible gases.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 1 January 2003
Keywords: si-planar-pellistor, catalytic-oxidation, supported palladium, methane oxidation, high-sensitivity, metal-catalysts, platinum films, alumina, state, chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 19889
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/19889
ISSN: 0003-2700
PURE UUID: 7fd7c759-a88f-49c5-92b3-5720bbee670b
ORCID for Philip N. Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7300-6900

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Feb 2006
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 02:42

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Samuel Guerin

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×