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Quantification of undersea gas leaks from carbon capture and storage facilities, from pipelines and from methane seeps, by their acoustic emissions

Quantification of undersea gas leaks from carbon capture and storage facilities, from pipelines and from methane seeps, by their acoustic emissions
Quantification of undersea gas leaks from carbon capture and storage facilities, from pipelines and from methane seeps, by their acoustic emissions
In recent years, because of the importance of leak detection from carbon capture and storage facilities and the need to monitor methane seeps and undersea gas pipelines, there has been an increased requirement for methods of detecting bubbles released from the seabed into the water column. If undetected and uncorrected, such leaks can generate huge financial and environmental losses. This paper describes a theory by which the passive acoustic signals detected by a hydrophone array can be used to quantify gas leakage, providing a practical (as opposed to research), passive and remote detection system which can monitor over a period of years using simple instrumentation. The sensitivity in detecting and quantifying the flux of gas is shown to exceed by more than two orders of magnitude the sensitivity of the current model-based techniques used commercially for gas leaks from large, long pipelines.
carbon sequestration, methane seeps, gassy marine sediments, acoustic, leak monitoring
1364-5021
485-510
Leighton, T.G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
White, P.R.
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Leighton, T.G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
White, P.R.
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba

Leighton, T.G. and White, P.R. (2012) Quantification of undersea gas leaks from carbon capture and storage facilities, from pipelines and from methane seeps, by their acoustic emissions. Proceedings of the Royal Society A, 468, 485-510. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0221).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In recent years, because of the importance of leak detection from carbon capture and storage facilities and the need to monitor methane seeps and undersea gas pipelines, there has been an increased requirement for methods of detecting bubbles released from the seabed into the water column. If undetected and uncorrected, such leaks can generate huge financial and environmental losses. This paper describes a theory by which the passive acoustic signals detected by a hydrophone array can be used to quantify gas leakage, providing a practical (as opposed to research), passive and remote detection system which can monitor over a period of years using simple instrumentation. The sensitivity in detecting and quantifying the flux of gas is shown to exceed by more than two orders of magnitude the sensitivity of the current model-based techniques used commercially for gas leaks from large, long pipelines.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 14 October 2011
Published date: January 2012
Keywords: carbon sequestration, methane seeps, gassy marine sediments, acoustic, leak monitoring
Organisations: Acoustics Group, Signal Processing & Control Grp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 199499
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/199499
ISSN: 1364-5021
PURE UUID: c20437a9-25e9-4aeb-a12f-17f350ee87a9
ORCID for T.G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for P.R. White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4787-8713

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Oct 2011 11:13
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 02:02

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