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Vitamin D and the postmenopausal population

Vitamin D and the postmenopausal population
Vitamin D and the postmenopausal population
Vitamin D, a hormone critical to the body's maintenance of serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations, is currently the subject of much scientific interest. Low levels of vitamin D have been observed in many populations and epidemiological studies have suggested a link between this biochemical state and a range of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. While the consequence of vitamin D deficiency is well documented for bone (rickets and osteomalacia), with mixed findings relating to falls and fractures, a causal link between vitamin D deficiency and these wider health outcomes has not been established. If these relationships were found to be causal, the morbidity and mortality resulting from low levels of vitamin D could be substantial; the current evidence base, however, most robustly supports the assessment of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D in the context of specific symptoms, low bone mineral density or biochemical abnormalities, rather than as an entity to treat in its own right or as the basis for a population-wide screening programme.

vitamin D, calcium, deficiency, insufficiency, PTH, falls, fractures
1754-0453
102-107
Holroyd, Christopher
38511e1e-7504-45d0-ab00-eacf22108b7a
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Holroyd, Christopher
38511e1e-7504-45d0-ab00-eacf22108b7a
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145

Holroyd, Christopher, Cooper, Cyrus and Harvey, Nicholas C. (2011) Vitamin D and the postmenopausal population. Menopause International, 17 (3), 102-107. (doi:10.1258/mi.2011.011025). (PMID:21903714)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Vitamin D, a hormone critical to the body's maintenance of serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations, is currently the subject of much scientific interest. Low levels of vitamin D have been observed in many populations and epidemiological studies have suggested a link between this biochemical state and a range of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. While the consequence of vitamin D deficiency is well documented for bone (rickets and osteomalacia), with mixed findings relating to falls and fractures, a causal link between vitamin D deficiency and these wider health outcomes has not been established. If these relationships were found to be causal, the morbidity and mortality resulting from low levels of vitamin D could be substantial; the current evidence base, however, most robustly supports the assessment of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D in the context of specific symptoms, low bone mineral density or biochemical abnormalities, rather than as an entity to treat in its own right or as the basis for a population-wide screening programme.

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More information

Published date: September 2011
Keywords: vitamin D, calcium, deficiency, insufficiency, PTH, falls, fractures
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 199675
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/199675
ISSN: 1754-0453
PURE UUID: 3583da85-1be9-40e6-854d-132ee9c11412
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Nicholas C. Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Oct 2011 11:36
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:14

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Contributors

Author: Christopher Holroyd
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD

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