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Eye movements reveal no immediate “WOW” (“which one's weird”) effect in autism spectrum disorder

Eye movements reveal no immediate “WOW” (“which one's weird”) effect in autism spectrum disorder
Eye movements reveal no immediate “WOW” (“which one's weird”) effect in autism spectrum disorder
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developed (TD) adult participants viewed pairs of scenes for a simple "spot the difference" (STD) and a complex "which one's weird" (WOW) task. There were no group differences in the STD task. In the WOW task, the ASD group took longer to respond manually and to begin fixating the target "weird" region. Additionally, as indexed by the first-fixation duration into the target region, the ASD group failed to "pick up" immediately on what was "weird". The findings are discussed with reference to the complex information processing theory of ASD (Minshew & Goldstein, 1998 ).
autism spectrum disorder, eye movements, online cognitive processing, complex information processing
1747-0218
1139-1150
Benson, Valerie
4827cede-6668-4e3d-bded-ade4cd5e5db5
Castelhano, Monica
feb47549-199e-4c71-affb-ff47f9bbdb3a
Au Yeung, Sheena
562efc22-fac4-4118-9564-e3211d17b70b
Rayner, Keith
15f4ff90-d631-457b-a055-3944b702ea27
Benson, Valerie
4827cede-6668-4e3d-bded-ade4cd5e5db5
Castelhano, Monica
feb47549-199e-4c71-affb-ff47f9bbdb3a
Au Yeung, Sheena
562efc22-fac4-4118-9564-e3211d17b70b
Rayner, Keith
15f4ff90-d631-457b-a055-3944b702ea27

Benson, Valerie, Castelhano, Monica, Au Yeung, Sheena and Rayner, Keith (2012) Eye movements reveal no immediate “WOW” (“which one's weird”) effect in autism spectrum disorder. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , 65 (6), 1139-1150. (doi:10.1080/17470218.2011.644305). (PMID:22360368)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developed (TD) adult participants viewed pairs of scenes for a simple "spot the difference" (STD) and a complex "which one's weird" (WOW) task. There were no group differences in the STD task. In the WOW task, the ASD group took longer to respond manually and to begin fixating the target "weird" region. Additionally, as indexed by the first-fixation duration into the target region, the ASD group failed to "pick up" immediately on what was "weird". The findings are discussed with reference to the complex information processing theory of ASD (Minshew & Goldstein, 1998 ).

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 30 November 2011
Published date: 2012
Keywords: autism spectrum disorder, eye movements, online cognitive processing, complex information processing
Organisations: Cognition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 202657
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/202657
ISSN: 1747-0218
PURE UUID: f1daf4c2-083b-4313-a79c-bd967d1be374

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Date deposited: 09 Nov 2011 13:41
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 11:10

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Contributors

Author: Valerie Benson
Author: Monica Castelhano
Author: Sheena Au Yeung
Author: Keith Rayner

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