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Does obesity predict knee pain over fourteen years in women, independently of radiographic changes?

Does obesity predict knee pain over fourteen years in women, independently of radiographic changes?
Does obesity predict knee pain over fourteen years in women, independently of radiographic changes?
Objective. To examine longitudinal patterns in body mass index (BMI) over 14 years and its association with knee pain
in the Chingford Study.
Methods. We studied a total of 594 women with BMI data from clinic visits at years (Y) 1, 5, 10, and 15. Knee pain at Y15
was assessed by questionnaire. Associations between BMI over 14 years and knee pain at Y15 were examined using
logistic regression.
Results. BMI significantly increased from Y1 to Y15 (P < 0.0005) with medians (interquartile ranges) of 24.5 kg/m2
(22.5–27.2 kg/m2) and 26.5 kg/m2 (23.9–30.1 kg/m2), respectively. At Y15, 45.1% of subjects had knee pain. A greater BMI
at Y1 (odds ratio [OR] 1.34, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.05–1.69), at Y15 (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.10–1.61), and change
in BMI over 15 years (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.00–1.93) were significant predictors of knee pain at Y15 (P < 0.05). BMI change
was associated with bilateral (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.05–1.76, P ? 0.024) but not unilateral knee pain (OR 1.22, 95% CI
0.73–1.76, P ? 0.298). The association between BMI change and knee pain was independent of radiographic knee
osteoarthritis (OA). The strength of association between BMI and knee pain at Y15 was similar during followup
measurements.
Conclusion. Over 14 years, a higher BMI predicts knee pain at Y15 in women, independently of radiographic knee OA.
When adjusted, the association was significant in bilateral, not unilateral, knee pain, suggesting alternative pathologic
mechanisms may exist. The longitudinal effect of BMI on knee pain at Y15 is equally important at any time point, which
may assist reducing the population burden of knee pain.
0004-3591
1398-1406
Goulston, Lyndsey M.
a7e620bf-d0d7-422d-9872-e9c43f79bfe9
Kiran, A.
5c4f2210-4951-4226-a44b-e6ecfb9c5c71
Javaid, M. Kassim
64155236-2ef0-4065-b684-cf723a888117
Soni, A.
7a4196ff-0f6b-429e-af54-d1036e9c433b
White, K .M.
18eb244a-83d8-4049-9138-1ee394dc99a3
Hart, D. J.
735e2b00-41b0-46dc-bc28-52b458017c39
Spector, T. D.
29debf10-949d-4094-8f5f-9a8614511ccb
Arden, N. K.
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f
Goulston, Lyndsey M.
a7e620bf-d0d7-422d-9872-e9c43f79bfe9
Kiran, A.
5c4f2210-4951-4226-a44b-e6ecfb9c5c71
Javaid, M. Kassim
64155236-2ef0-4065-b684-cf723a888117
Soni, A.
7a4196ff-0f6b-429e-af54-d1036e9c433b
White, K .M.
18eb244a-83d8-4049-9138-1ee394dc99a3
Hart, D. J.
735e2b00-41b0-46dc-bc28-52b458017c39
Spector, T. D.
29debf10-949d-4094-8f5f-9a8614511ccb
Arden, N. K.
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f

Goulston, Lyndsey M., Kiran, A., Javaid, M. Kassim, Soni, A., White, K .M., Hart, D. J., Spector, T. D. and Arden, N. K. (2011) Does obesity predict knee pain over fourteen years in women, independently of radiographic changes? Arthritis & Rheumatism, 63 (10), 1398-1406. (doi:10.1002/acr.20546). (PMID:21739621)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective. To examine longitudinal patterns in body mass index (BMI) over 14 years and its association with knee pain
in the Chingford Study.
Methods. We studied a total of 594 women with BMI data from clinic visits at years (Y) 1, 5, 10, and 15. Knee pain at Y15
was assessed by questionnaire. Associations between BMI over 14 years and knee pain at Y15 were examined using
logistic regression.
Results. BMI significantly increased from Y1 to Y15 (P < 0.0005) with medians (interquartile ranges) of 24.5 kg/m2
(22.5–27.2 kg/m2) and 26.5 kg/m2 (23.9–30.1 kg/m2), respectively. At Y15, 45.1% of subjects had knee pain. A greater BMI
at Y1 (odds ratio [OR] 1.34, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.05–1.69), at Y15 (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.10–1.61), and change
in BMI over 15 years (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.00–1.93) were significant predictors of knee pain at Y15 (P < 0.05). BMI change
was associated with bilateral (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.05–1.76, P ? 0.024) but not unilateral knee pain (OR 1.22, 95% CI
0.73–1.76, P ? 0.298). The association between BMI change and knee pain was independent of radiographic knee
osteoarthritis (OA). The strength of association between BMI and knee pain at Y15 was similar during followup
measurements.
Conclusion. Over 14 years, a higher BMI predicts knee pain at Y15 in women, independently of radiographic knee OA.
When adjusted, the association was significant in bilateral, not unilateral, knee pain, suggesting alternative pathologic
mechanisms may exist. The longitudinal effect of BMI on knee pain at Y15 is equally important at any time point, which
may assist reducing the population burden of knee pain.

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Published date: October 2011
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 202775
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/202775
ISSN: 0004-3591
PURE UUID: f4cfdb5f-3166-462a-8afe-5921529637de

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Date deposited: 09 Nov 2011 10:43
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 23:18

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Contributors

Author: Lyndsey M. Goulston
Author: A. Kiran
Author: M. Kassim Javaid
Author: A. Soni
Author: K .M. White
Author: D. J. Hart
Author: T. D. Spector
Author: N. K. Arden

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