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Planning for climate change in small islands: insights from national hurricane preparedness in the Cayman Islands

Planning for climate change in small islands: insights from national hurricane preparedness in the Cayman Islands
Planning for climate change in small islands: insights from national hurricane preparedness in the Cayman Islands
This paper examines contemporary national scale responses to tropical storm risk in a small island in the Caribbean to derive lessons for adapting to climate change. There is little empirical evidence to guide national planners on how to adapt to climate change, and less still on how to build on past adaptation experiences. The paper investigates the construction of institutional resilience and the process of adaptation to tropical storm risk by the Cayman Islands’ Government from 1988 to 2002. It explains the roles of persuasion, exposure and collective action as key components in developing the ability to buffer external disturbance using models of institutional economics and social resilience concepts. The study finds that self-efficacy, strong local and international support networks, combined with a willingness to act collectively and to learn from mistakes appear to have increased the resilience of the Cayman Islands’ Government to tropical storm risk. The lessons learned from building resilience to storm risk can contribute to the creation of national level adaptive capacity to climate change, but climate change has to be prioritised before these lessons can be transferred
0959-3780
139-149
Tompkins, Emma L.
a6116704-7140-4e37-bea1-2cbf39b138c3
Tompkins, Emma L.
a6116704-7140-4e37-bea1-2cbf39b138c3

Tompkins, Emma L. (2005) Planning for climate change in small islands: insights from national hurricane preparedness in the Cayman Islands. [in special issue: Adaptation to Climate Change: Perspectives Across Scales] Global Environmental Change, 15 (2), 139-149. (doi:10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2004.11.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper examines contemporary national scale responses to tropical storm risk in a small island in the Caribbean to derive lessons for adapting to climate change. There is little empirical evidence to guide national planners on how to adapt to climate change, and less still on how to build on past adaptation experiences. The paper investigates the construction of institutional resilience and the process of adaptation to tropical storm risk by the Cayman Islands’ Government from 1988 to 2002. It explains the roles of persuasion, exposure and collective action as key components in developing the ability to buffer external disturbance using models of institutional economics and social resilience concepts. The study finds that self-efficacy, strong local and international support networks, combined with a willingness to act collectively and to learn from mistakes appear to have increased the resilience of the Cayman Islands’ Government to tropical storm risk. The lessons learned from building resilience to storm risk can contribute to the creation of national level adaptive capacity to climate change, but climate change has to be prioritised before these lessons can be transferred

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 9 April 2005
Published date: July 2005
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 202853
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/202853
ISSN: 0959-3780
PURE UUID: 61413596-9060-4523-9f84-d3c48e6c2c8a

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Date deposited: 10 Nov 2011 14:27
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 17:50

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