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From personhood to citizenship: broadening the conceptual base for dementia practice and research

From personhood to citizenship: broadening the conceptual base for dementia practice and research
From personhood to citizenship: broadening the conceptual base for dementia practice and research
Personhood has provided a lens for conceptualising dementia practice and research for over ten years. It has afforded the rationale and language for improving care and for raising consciousness about the status of people with dementia, as people, intrinsically worthy of respect. However, because personhood is essentially an apolitical concept concerned with psychosocial issues it may be too limiting. Citizenship provides another possible lens. Citizenship is used in cognate disciplines to promote the status of discriminated groups of people still further, to that of a person with power entitled to the same from life as everyone else. However, as citizenship tends to assume the self-cognizance to exercise rights and responsibilities, it may not be as appropriate for people with severe dementia. Both concepts are problematic then, taking too narrow a view of the human experience. For this field to develop over the next ten years it clearly needs a wider lens that is both inclusive of personhood and citizenship, but which also recognizes the complexities of human experience. This article reviews the relevance of personhood and citizenship for dementia practice and research, and argues for a broader lens that incorporates citizenship and sociological ideas about agency and structure.

agency, citizenship, dementia, personhood, structure
0890-4065
107-118
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3
O'Conner, Deborah
61241d58-ae56-4dce-b85f-1018cdea0944
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3
O'Conner, Deborah
61241d58-ae56-4dce-b85f-1018cdea0944

Bartlett, Ruth and O'Conner, Deborah (2007) From personhood to citizenship: broadening the conceptual base for dementia practice and research. Journal of Aging Studies, 21 (2), 107-118. (doi:10.1016/j.jaging.2006.09.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Personhood has provided a lens for conceptualising dementia practice and research for over ten years. It has afforded the rationale and language for improving care and for raising consciousness about the status of people with dementia, as people, intrinsically worthy of respect. However, because personhood is essentially an apolitical concept concerned with psychosocial issues it may be too limiting. Citizenship provides another possible lens. Citizenship is used in cognate disciplines to promote the status of discriminated groups of people still further, to that of a person with power entitled to the same from life as everyone else. However, as citizenship tends to assume the self-cognizance to exercise rights and responsibilities, it may not be as appropriate for people with severe dementia. Both concepts are problematic then, taking too narrow a view of the human experience. For this field to develop over the next ten years it clearly needs a wider lens that is both inclusive of personhood and citizenship, but which also recognizes the complexities of human experience. This article reviews the relevance of personhood and citizenship for dementia practice and research, and argues for a broader lens that incorporates citizenship and sociological ideas about agency and structure.

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More information

Published date: April 2007
Keywords: agency, citizenship, dementia, personhood, structure
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 203695
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/203695
ISSN: 0890-4065
PURE UUID: 5845f08b-bd92-40f0-93d7-f71dd33dacdb
ORCID for Ruth Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3412-2300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2011 12:45
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:31

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